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juiceit
01-11-2012, 11:23 AM
Always been roughly between 11 to 11 1/2 stone, last year while i was training was awy from it for about 2- 3 months because of work but from sart of january started up again with a goal to get as big as i could (hopefully) I am spending quite a bit of time in the gym (2-3 hours depending on workout).

Problem is I weighed my self on day 1 andwas bang on 12 stone, which was the starting goal i wanted last year, I thought once I started gaining weight i would continue but since i've started training again I have gone to just under the 12stone and not gaining. I am eating steaks chicken beak potatoes pasta ect so all good stuff i hope but just dissapointed that im not gaining weight.

Is this because im shedding body fat before i gain properly?

cheers

daz:confused:

tjwood
01-11-2012, 12:29 PM
Eat more.

At the basic level it's a simple equation. If you don't have enough food going in, you'll burn it all doing exercise, and you won't have any left to fuel weight gains.

Also, it's less than 2 weeks into January... you do need to give things a little time! Remember your weight can vary by a couple of pounds from one day to the next (or at different times of day) due to things such as hydration levels, so don't take one measurement where you are "just under" too seriously.

Deviation
01-11-2012, 01:07 PM
What's your calorie intake? What are your macros? What's your height?

And 2-3 hours in the gym? Depending on what you're doing, you could be burning off fat and muscle. Really depends on what you're taking in.

tjohnstad
01-11-2012, 01:15 PM
Hi!

Nice to know that it is not just me! :p

This is all a bit complex, but too sum it up, you will as you say, shed a bit of fat in the start.

...
Especially if you are familiar with working out from earlier..
Your body sheds the "excess" fat that is stored up in the body- because you are giving it more than enough by eating(ALOT and properly!), including that your body consumes more calories after you got your lazy ass back to the gym..!
:cool:
So as tjwood is saying, eat more(!) and give it some time;)

juiceit
01-11-2012, 03:09 PM
as im still amateur to all this, Im still unsure of some things ie how to know calorie intake, macros ect (I know how to do my height lol)
HOw do you work them out?
As not on a big budget iroughly have 30 to spend on food for myself besides what she spend on family shop like today had spare cash and bought steaks chicken , brown rice n stuff, but how do you work out macros n calorie intake.

proberbly simple but never done it

thx again everyone

Deviation
01-11-2012, 04:17 PM
It's not too technical but you need your weight, age, and height to get started. Here's a quick calculator i put together for BMR: http://digitaldeviation.com/calc/

After the BMI, you'll see the Mifflin-St Jeor calculation. That will give you your BMR (basal metabolic rate) and the amount of calories you need to consume based on your activity level.

Macros are a bit more technical and personal. What works awesome for one, sucks for another. It also depends on whether you want to bulk or cut or just maintain. I'm working on making one for that. ;)

juiceit
01-11-2012, 04:19 PM
thx deviation, keep us posted on that one will work out the other now

juiceit
01-11-2012, 04:31 PM
thx deviation, keep us posted on that one will work out the other now:
here we go
link
http://digitaldeviation.com/calc/ IM overweight slightly but if im trying to bulk and muscle does grow wouldnt i always be overweight.
and as deviation says might be to many hours in gym lol (but i'm determined) So can any body recomend a good bulk up work out as advanced as possible 4 days max as with my job mightnt make any more time in gym but since started this job after xmas i have been lucky to put so much time in

p.s how do i work out calorie intake. thx

Deviation
01-11-2012, 04:40 PM
That link didn't work (and won't; another missing feature). Ignore BMI. It has no relevance in weight lifting.

You should see a table below BMI that lists calories for a given activity level. Depending on your day job/life and the gym time you spend, you will choose an activity level (sendentary, lightly, moderately, very, extremely). Hint: most people aren't in the extremely category. ;)

juiceit
01-11-2012, 05:37 PM
14731

hereswhat i got

guess I would be moderately active as i'm a boatmen (tie ships up at ports) Its a lot of heavy shoulder and arm work

Deviation
01-11-2012, 06:36 PM
There ya go. You're probably towards the higher range of that. Plug that into an app like MyFitnessPal and track your food. You may be surprise how much you undereat.

decu68
01-11-2012, 06:57 PM
I put no faith in BMI calculators. I am 43 years old, 5'8" and 205 lbs and I come up as 31.17 (Obese); I am far from obese. These things cannot take into consideration muscle mass and I have yet to find a good calculator that can represent this. The calorie thing is neat though. I used to track my calories religiously but that just gets too boring really fast. I already know I don't eat enough calories and that I am limiting my growth however when I do eat the required calories and eat the right foods I tend to gain unwanted weight. I could never find a balance.

Good luck to you juiceit. (don't like the name, to me it implies you are using PEDs)

juiceit
01-11-2012, 07:06 PM
Good app that m8 thx can it be linked to jefit to save adding all data again?

juiceit
01-11-2012, 07:08 PM
no decu68
thats what people started calling me in work juice head 'cos im never out the gym so when my hotmail accouny got messed with thought be funny to use it as email addy lol

Deviation
01-11-2012, 07:26 PM
Good app that m8 thx can it be linked to jefit to save adding all data again?
I wish. Maybe someday.

juiceit
01-11-2012, 07:28 PM
thx agaln m8 inputting all data looks like im well under eating lol

tjwood
01-11-2012, 07:33 PM
I put no faith in BMI calculators. I am 43 years old, 5'8" and 205 lbs and I come up as 31.17 (Obese); I am far from obese. These things cannot take into consideration muscle mass and I have yet to find a good calculator that can represent this.

Body Mass Index was never designed to be applied on an individual scale - it was designed for population studies where differences between individual builds are averaged out. It provides a rough rule of thumb for sedentary individuals but for anyone who does regular exercise it's pretty much meaningless.

Also, the taller you are, the more likely BMI is to report you as being overweight (and if you're shorter than average, underweight) as it is the ratio of weight to the square of height which is disproportionate to reality (expects tall people to be very skinny and short people to be the opposite).

tjwood
01-11-2012, 07:42 PM
It's not too technical but you need your weight, age, and height to get started. Here's a quick calculator i put together for BMR: http://digitaldeviation.com/calc/

Hi Deviation

Your calculator seems to have a couple of issues - if I put the units in centimetres/kilograms the BMI calculation is way out. It seems it selects the imperial units anyway - looks like this is because your metric radio buttons have a different name to your imperial ones.

Why is the number of calories reported in green lower than any of the values in the table?

Also BMI is technically not a percentage (it is a value in kg/m^2 if you want to be picky :-) but normally reported without a unit)

Deviation
01-11-2012, 08:07 PM
Hi Deviation

Your calculator seems to have a couple of issues - if I put the units in centimetres/kilograms the BMI calculation is way out. It seems it selects the imperial units anyway - looks like this is because your metric radio buttons have a different name to your imperial ones.

Actually haven't tested most of it to be honest. It was just a "fun" project i started a while back. I'll take a look at that.


Why is the number of calories reported in green lower than any of the values in the table?
That's your BMR. The absolute lowest number of calories required if you just laid in bed and didn't move.


Also BMI is technically not a percentage (it is a value in kg/m^2 if you want to be picky :-) but normally reported without a unit)
Yeah you're right. I'm not sure why I added a % sign?

Guess I have some tweaking to do.

Deviation
01-11-2012, 08:26 PM
Fixed the bugs tjwood found. Should be safe to use now. :cool:

decu68
01-11-2012, 08:51 PM
Body Mass Index was never designed to be applied on an individual scale - it was designed for population studies where differences between individual builds are averaged out. It provides a rough rule of thumb for sedentary individuals but for anyone who does regular exercise it's pretty much meaningless.

Also, the taller you are, the more likely BMI is to report you as being overweight (and if you're shorter than average, underweight) as it is the ratio of weight to the square of height which is disproportionate to reality (expects tall people to be very skinny and short people to be the opposite).

Sadly too many people use this including insurance companies, doctors, etc. I cannot tall you how many times I have been told I need to lose weight. A recent form I had to fill out asked my weight and stuff and I knew that they would see me being as over weight but how do I tell them that I'm physically fit. I remember my doctor telling me I needed to lose some weight. I looked at my abdominal area and could see abs and than I looked at his which was a good start to a pot belly. I said "Really?" He got the message.

Juiceit ... thanks for the explanation, makes better sense.

juiceit
01-11-2012, 08:59 PM
no problem m8 because of gym i go to and idiots in work 'cos i say im in2 bodybuilding they put 2 + 2 together n get 9000

tjohnstad
01-12-2012, 02:18 PM
Nice calc Deviation! ;)

I would recommend a 5x5 program, either Stronglift`s or one of theese (http://www.jefit.com/routines/?authorid=411659) :)
(one is 3day other one is 4day ;) )

Nice nick btw ;)

volcom54o
01-20-2012, 06:48 PM
Personally I think that spending 2-3 hours at the gym is overworking your body. After the first hour or hour and half, if your muscles are spent and injury can occur more likely.

Try resting less in between sets and doing slow reps, as to not do too much cardio while lifting and maintaining form.

decu68
01-20-2012, 08:17 PM
Agreed, 2-3 hours in a gym is way too much. The only way you could perform at those levels would be if you were "using". Working smart is the answer.

Over-training leads to injuries. Here are some other effects of over-training.

• Decreased muscle size and strength
• Longer-than-average recovery time after a workout
• Elevated waking pulse rate
• Elevated morning blood pressure
• Increased joint and muscle aches
• Headaches
• Hand tremors
• Tiredness
• Listlessness
• Insomnia
• Loss or decrease in appetite
• Injury
• Illness

Rather than me type of this I am going to copy and paste from Robert E. Spector (1994 - HIT FAQS). I am going to highlight some areas that are important to know. And I believe this because I have fallen victim many times.

"After the onset of high-intensity training exercise the body pumps out cortisol which breaks down protein into their constituent amino acids and routes them to the liver for conversion to glucose. The longer the workout, the more cortisol is pumped in and the more protein is destroyed. This causes a "catabolic state" as the largest supply of protein lies in the muscles so that is where the cortisol goes first.

Research by Costill and Nieman et al., has shown that one hour of intense strength training will increase the protein stores in our immune and skeletal systems, but that any further training will only begin to deplete these stores.

Overtraining can force the body into a weakened physical state, which, at best can produce a cold or the flu and, at worst, can tear muscles ligaments, and tendons once these body parts lose their structural integrity protein loss. The culprit is a built-in "survival" drug hormone called cortisol. Immediately following a high intensity effort, the body pumps out this hormone whose function is simple: It carries off the proteins to the liver, where they are converted into glucose, for energy use in the body.

Why does this weaken our defense mechanisms? Because all our immune systems are based on proteins, and the influx of control in our biological mix steals the proteins that make up our immune system.

Nieman, a researcher at Loma Linda University found that athletes who train twice as intensely as normally prescribed will wind up with twice as many colds, and viruses. Nieman investigated the athletes for cortisol. He found that astonishingly, after only ONE grueling strength training session, their bodies revealed a 60% increase in cortisol production.

Among the first proteins to go were the T-cells that make up our front line of defense against viruses. This watchdog system was depleted by more than 30 percent. However, this shortfall lasted only 6-8 hrs.

So you're probably thinking "What's the big deal? Is putting your body at risk for only 6-8 hours such a high price to pay?"

Well, Nieman and other researchers found that after a few days of such exercising, the "at risk" time became longer and longer, until the T-cells stopped rejuvenation.

In addition, the body's first line of defense against bacteria and viruses an antibody known as IgA, which is found in the saliva, was reduced to nearly non-protective levels.

The conclusion of the researchers was that athletes can overtrain themselves into illness.

Thus the logical conclusion would be that high intensity strength training should be limited to one hour or less to restrict the amount of protein destruction."



Get in and get out. Try to do it in 1 hour or less. More is not always better. Lift smart, lift for life.