Are You on Board with the New Obesity Paradigm?

Some scientists are starting to believe that obesity research has been coming from a failed paradigm. For close to a hundred years now it has been believed that the cause of obesity was a surplus of calories. When a person takes in more calories than they expend, overtime, that individual becomes overweight. Many think, however, that obesity research is based on a misbelief. According to the World Health Organization, though, it’s still about “an energy imbalance between calories consumed and calories expended.” So who do we believe?

Many researchers and science reporters, like NYT best-selling author Gary Taubes, believe that it’s time for a new paradigm. A group of these researchers have actually published a lengthy review article on this obesity topic, that comes out today in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. This group believes we should move away from the current energy balance model (EBM) to a new carbohydrate-insulin model (CIM).

Moving Towards a Possible CIM: Carbohydrate-Insulin Model

According to this model, increasing fat deposits in the body, resulting from the hormonal responses to a high-glycemic-load diet, is what drives positive energy balance. Other words, it’s not about eating too many “good” calories, it’s more about “food quality.” We need to be aware of the quantity and quality of specific calories coming from carbohydrates.

A high percentage of carbohydrates in each meal, coming from processed foods, contain high amounts of added sugar. Each time we eat meals and snacks like this, our body has to deal with a sugar spike. When this occurs, the pancreas releases the hormone insulin, to bring down blood glucose. The by-product of this? the body stores more fat (triglycerides) in adipose tissue.

This new paradigm shift states that obesity is not an energy balance issue but rather a hormonal disorder or what the researchers call a “disorder of fuel partitioning.” The calories in versus calories out debate says nothing about why it happens.

Where Do You Lie on this Obesity Topic in Favor of the EBM or CIM?

We mentioned author Gary Taubes earlier. If this topic is of interest to you, he has some outstanding books that explore various obesity-related topics and does a deep dive into why too much added sugar is so unhealthy for us.

So what do you think? do we become obese by taking in more calories than we expend? Or is it more about the quality and quantity of carbohydrates and what those sugar calories do to our physiology over time?

Jules Hirsch of Rockefeller University, one of the most celebrated obesity researchers, told Gary Taubes in 2002 that after 40 years of research he still didn’t know why people got fat to begin with. Looks like this debate will rage on for a bit longer but let’s hope it’s not another hundred years!

References

Taubes, G. (2021). How a “fatally, tragically flawed” paradigm has derailed the science of obesity. STAT.

Ludwig, D., et al. (2021). The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, https://doi.org/10.1093/ajcn/nqab270

Try Jefit App Today

Try Jefit app, named best app for 2020 and 2021 by PC MagazineMen’s HealthThe Manual and the Greatist. The app comes equipped with a customizable workout planner and training log. In addition, the app has ability to track data, offer audio cues, and has a feature to share workouts with friends. Take advantage of Jefit’s exercise database for your strength workouts. Visit our members-only Facebook group. Connect with like-minded people, share tips, and advice to help get closer to reaching your fitness goals. Try one of the new interval-based workouts and add it to your weekly training schedule. Stay strong with Jefit as you live your fitness lifestyle.

Activities to Bring Your Exercise Routine to the Next Level

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There are many activities to choose from when trying to get in or stay in shape. Some activities are better than others and may be more beneficial when added as part of a weekly exercise routine.

The following three activities are some of the best based on their high energy expenditure. Each is ideal in their own right because they offer multiple options. The following activities also fit well as part of a warm-up or for circuit training.

Add Jumping Rope to Your Exercise Routine

There is a great deal of research on the benefits of jumping rope. One such study, was led by John Baker of Arizona State University. He divided 92 male students into two groups. One half of the group skipped rope for 10-minutes a day while the other half jogged for 30-minutes a day. After six-weeks, the men were administered the Harvard Step Test to measure changes in cardiovascular fitness. Each group showed an equal level of improvement.

Baker concluded that 10-minutes a day of jumping rope was as efficient as 30-minutes a day of jogging. He meant meant more specifically, when looking to improve cardiovascular efficiency. He recommends jumping rope, which is less time-consuming than jogging, as a valuable component for any physical education program; especially when the goal is to improve endurance. A 2013 study published in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise found 10-minute “bursts” of exercise, like rope jumping, added to your daily quota of exercise, improves fitness.  It concluded that ‘some exercise is better than nothing’ and that by adding small bouts of exercise you can lead to a big impact.

Jumping rope will expend about a 750 calories an hour depending on bodyweight (at 120-140 turns per minute). This is equivalent to running close to a six-minute mile pace. When the intensity is increased, the caloric expenditure can increase to 1000 calories or more per hour. A boxer can hit 300 RPM in a minute of jumping rope. You can also experiment with a weighted jump rope or wear a weight vest to challenge yourself more.

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Rowing is a Great Addition to any Exercise Routine

There is a reason why facilities like Crossfit, have ergs or Concept 2 rowing machines lined up. It is a complete, full body workout that uses about 85 percent of the muscles on the body. Rowing alone is a great exercise. It is ideal for a WOD or placed in a circuit. Finally, it can be a beneficial warm-up prior to hitting the weight. Try a 500 meter row prior to your next strength workout. If you want a great aerobic test, try to row 500 meters in about a minute thirty! For a great full body workout try the following routine:

30-20-10 Rowing Protocol – Start with an easy row for 3 to 5 minutes to warm-up. Then row 30-seconds at a low intensity, followed by 20-seconds using a moderate intensity and finally, row all out, high intensity, for 10-seconds. Repeat x 5 and cool-down. Progress to doing this x 10 rounds.

Try HIIT for Maximal Gains in Minimal Time

High intensity interval training (HIIT) is an exercise topic that arguably been studied more in the past decade than any other. It is highly likely, that every aspect of HIIT has been looked at. Research from Petrofsky and colleagues (2011) in the Journal of Applied Physiology is one such example. In that study, a 6-minute HIIT protocol elevated metabolism in test subjects for 36 hours. A second study, published in the Journal of Strength & Conditioning, showed similar results. Subjects in this study performed just 27 minutes a week of interval-based exercise. The study showed VO2 max and work output increased 11 and 4.3 percent respectively in just 6 weeks.

The Jefit app offers many HIIT options for all training abilities, with equipment or just bodyweight. In addition, cardio intervals are great for burning some calories on the days you don’t do strength training. Add some of these activities into your weekly training routines to take your program to the next level.

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5 Great Exercises That Will Help Build Muscle

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A recent New York Times article looked at the importance of getting stronger and to build muscle. It report that, according to researchers, only 6 percent of adults performed at least two strength workouts each week. Everyone knows that regular strength training is one of the best time and energy investments for better health. Compared to other countries, however, our physical inactivity and obesity numbers are simply embarrassing.

Why Build Muscle?

Because muscle starts to deteriorate when we reach our 30’s. After age 40, we lose on average 8 percent of our muscle mass every decade, and this phenomenon, known as sarcopenia, continues to accelerate at an even faster rate after age 60.

The good news is exercise scientists from the Buck Institute for Research on Aging found that doing just two strength training sessions each week can reverse age-related cellular damage that causes muscle atrophy.

Muscle Index

In 2014, researchers at UCLA Medical school found something very interesting. They followed more than 3,600 healthy subjects for about a decade. In that study they noticed a subjects muscle mass was closely linked to their lifespan. They found this out by pinpointing their “muscle index” or someones muscle mass divided by your height squared. “Those who were in the group with the highest muscle index had the lowest mortality, while those who had the lowest muscle index had the highest mortality rates.” Their published research “showed that muscle index was an even better predictor of premature mortality than obesity.”

To build and maintain muscle mass you need to engage in regular strength training. Here are what many consider five of the “better” exercises to perform in order to build muscle and maintain it as you age. Each exercise also offers progressions to try before attempting each exercise, if needed.

Deadlift

The deadlift is easily one of the best exercise you can do to build muscle. It’s a valuable compound movement targeting the back, hips, legs and grip. It’s also ideal for developing posterior chain strength. The movement, however, can be challenging for some. If that is the case, there are some suggested progression options for you prior to the deadlift.

Progressions: Hex-bar deadlift and Romanian deadlift

Squat

Considered the king of the compound lower body movements for building muscle at any age. Best advice, especially if you’re young or a training novice, master the front squat prior to progressing to a barbell squat.

Progression: DB Wall Squat, Front Squat, Partial Squats

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Pull Ups

There is not a better compound back exercise you can do for the upper extremity. The movement recruits many muscle groups while offering multiple training variation like wide/close grip or assisted pull ups.

Progression: Inverted Row, Machine Assisted, Assisted (Band) Pull Ups, Chin-ups

Bench Press

Considered a favorite exercise for the majority of gym goers. It incorporates a large number of muscles to execute the movement. You can do it from an incline/decline position or use dumbbells, barbell, kettlebells or cables.

Progression: T-Push Ups, Incline/Decline Push Ups, Weighted Push Ups

Shoulder Press

A great compound exercise to build muscle for the deltoid group. It really works your entire body when performed from a standing position. Holding weight overhead also works the core.

Progression: Kettlebell Thrusters, Dumbbell/Barbell Push Press

One of the first things you might have noticed, all five of our suggested exercises are compound movements. Add some of these muscle building exercises into your next Jefit program. If they are not the answer to your current needs, try the suggested progressions to build up instead.

Use Jefit App to Record & Track Your Workouts

Jefit app was named best app for 2020 and 2021 by PC MagazineMen’s HealthThe Manual and the Greatist. The app comes equipped with a customizable workout planner and training log. The app has ability to track data, offer audio cues, and features to share workouts with friends. Take advantage of Jefit’s exercise database for your strength workouts. Visit our members-only Facebook group. Connect with like-minded people, share tips, and advice to help get closer to reaching your fitness goals. Try one of the new interval-based workouts and add it to your weekly training schedule. Stay strong with Jefit as you live your sustainable fitness lifestyle.

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Health Benefits of Performing Strength and Cardio Exercise

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The health benefits associated with performing strength training on a regular basis, especially as one ages, are many. Cardiovascular exercise, from walking to running, is also key, especially when used as a “COVID-19 mood booster” or stress reliever. What are the benefits of combining strength and cardio in your workout?

Should we be doing both? Simply adding in short bouts of cardio (like jumping rope), with your weight training, can take a workout to the next level. It ends up challenging both your muscular and cardiovascular systems in one efficient workout. 

The Benefits of Combining Strength and Cardio Are Many

The goal of circuit weight training (CWT) is to move quickly from one exercise to the next with minimal rest. The design of a circuit can be as simple as performing an upper body, lower body and core exercise followed by a brief bout of cardio. The cardio could be jumping rope, jumping jacks, mountain climbers, basically anything that elevates heart rate. A 2013 study published in American Association for Health, Physical Education and Recreation, reported jumping rope can be one of the most effective cardio exercises. We’re talking better than running, swimming or rowing. Following six-weeks of jumping rope exercises (for 10-minutes/day), subjects displayed the same levels of cardiovascular efficiency as those who did 30 minutes of jogging.

There is also a hidden bonus with circuit-training, an “additional” calorie-burning benefit post-workout. The term associated with this is excess-post oxygen consumption (EPOC). This has the potential to occur when doing challenging circuit weight training programs. The body continues to expend additional calories for hours after the workout has been completed. The routine needs to be challenging though which this type of workout can definitely be.

Additional Research Backs Up the Benefits

According to a 2019 study published in the journal Obesity, those who combined strength training with cardio were less likely to become obese. A classic review study by Gettman and Pollock (1981) showed the average aerobic capacity increased by 5 percent while strength improved 7-32 percent. The good news with all the studies reviewed showed a 2-6 pound increase in muscle mass. The average length of the workouts reviewed was only 25-30 minutes. A second study by Wilmore and colleagues determined energy expenditure was 9 calories/minute for men and 6 calories/minute for women who performed circuit weight training programs. Finally, a 10-week study compared CWT to biking showing favorable results in multiple areas for CWT. This type of training was shown to  “lead to mild to moderate increases in aerobic capacity” and “muscle mass.”

Jefit Home Exercise Programs: 5 Circuit-Based Routines

Strength & Cardio Circuit. This is a 1-day routine that incorporates exercise and bouts of cardio. The only piece of cardio equipment needed, however, is a jump rope.

Home Circuit (30-minutes). This is a two-day program you can do that is a circuit using exercises only, no cardio. You move quickly from one exercise to the next with minimal rest between sets.

Home Bodyweight Circuit (Level 1). This program has only two circuits or rounds – compared to three – found in Level 2 and 3 of this program. When this routine becomes less challenging for you – progress to Level 2.

Home Bodyweight Circuit (Level 2). The design of these workout sessions consist of 5 body weight exercises that are repeated for 3 circuits or rounds. The session starts off with core work.

Home Bodyweight Circuit (Level 3). This program is designed as a circuit where you complete one round of 10 different exercises with minimal or no rest. Once completed, you return to the first exercise and move through another round of the circuit, until 3 rounds are completed.

This information presented hopefully offers additional insight into the value of performing circuit weight training more often. Continue to work hard and stay strong while using Jefit circuit-based workouts at home.

Use Jefit to Record and Track Your Strength and Cardio Workouts

Jefit is a strength training app used for planning & tracking workouts. It also helps gym goers and athletes keep on track with their fitness goals. Not only does it offer you the ability to update and share your workout log with a supportive community, it has the largest exercise library that covers both weight training and cardio.

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Important Facts About Lean Muscle and Body Fat

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The body is an amazing organism made up of different elements, including various types of tissue, bone, organ and fluid. Two of which, lean muscle and body fat, are discussed most often when it comes to exercise and living a sustainable lifestyle. We exercise and monitor our nutritional intake in order to build one, lean muscle, while trying to lose the other, body fat (also known as adipose tissue).

How Much Lean Muscle Does the Average Adult Carry?

Skeletal muscle is the most abundant tissue in our body, accounting for approximately 42 and 35 percent of body weight in men and women respectively. In other words, an average male weighing 185 pounds has about 78 pounds of lean muscle tissue while a female weighing 140 pounds has approximately 49 pounds of lean muscle tissue (note: this is not an “exact” number). Take muscle and fat out of the equation, and bodyweight still has other constituents like, water, mineral, bone, connective tissue, and organ weight. Speaking of organ weight, did you know the average human heart weighs about 10 ounces while the brain weighs about 3 pounds? That same average male may have, on average, about 25 percent body fat (or “about” 46 pounds of fat) while that average female may have 30 percent body fat (or “about” 42 pounds of fat).

Did You Know this About Lean Muscle

One of the amazing things about muscle tissue is it has the ability through progressive overload, to increase in size (known as muscle hypertrophy). Donnelly and colleagues have reported that strength training studies (lasting from 8 to 52 weeks) have shown increases of 2 to 5 pounds of muscle mass. In addition to increasing in size, muscle tissue also gets stronger with prolonged training. A periodized strength training program can elicit changes in endurance capacity, power output and force production while keeping sarcopenia at bay.

Protein stores found in muscle can account for about 30,000 calories of energy. Muscle tissue can contribute approximately 20 percent of the body’s total daily energy expenditure compared to 5 percent for fat tissue (it would be great if we could tap into those fat stores more often).

Lean muscle tissue requires 3-4 times more calories to maintain compared to fat and is important in the process of energy metabolism. A pound of metabolically active muscle tissue requires 5-7 calories per pound to maintain while less active fat tissue, requires only 2 calories per pound.

Finally, lean muscle plays an important role in the aging process. With advancing age we experience a loss of exercise capacity. This is due to first, to a decline in skeletal muscle mass and strength during aging and then a decrease in maximal oxygen uptake mainly due to a drop in maximal heart rate, according to Henning Wackerhage, PhD, a Senior Lecturer in Molecular Exercise Physiology at the University of Aberdeen.

Did You Know this About Fat

Fat is found in the body in the form of triglycerides and stored in fat cells which are called adipocytes. According to Coyle, about 50,000 to 60,000 calories of energy are stored in fat cells throughout the body. Fat can also be stored within skeletal muscle cells.

Fat accumulated in the lower body is subcutaneous. While fat in the abdominal area is largely visceral. Where fat ends up on your body is influenced by several factors, including hormones and heredity.

The photo below shows equivalent amounts of fat and muscle. Lean muscle, however, is more dense and takes up one-third less space compared to fat. Five pounds of muscle and fat may in fact weigh the same but that is where the similarities end.

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One thing is for certain, everyone wants more lean muscle and less body fat. Regular strength training is a much needed critical component for everything from health to activities of daily living. Check out some of the many great strength training routines found on Jefit, like the FitBody Plan. Stay strong with Jefit.

References

Marieb, EN and Hoehn, K. (2010). Human Anatomy and Physiology (8th ed.). San Francisco: Benjamin Cummings.

Elia, M. (1999). Organ and Tissue Contribution to Metabolic Weight. Energy Metabolism: Tissue Determinants and Cellular Corollaries. Kinney, J.M., Tucker, H.N., eds. Raven Press. New York.

Donnelly, J.E., Jakicic, J.M., et. al. (2003). Is Resistance Training Effective for Weight Management Evidence-Based Preventive Medicine. 1(1): 21-29.

Wackerhage, H. (2014). Molecules, Aging and Exercise in Molecular Exercise Physiology. Routledge.

Wood, M. (2018). TBC30: 6 Steps to a Stronger and Healthier You. Wicked Whale Publishing, 2nd edition.

Coyle, EF. (1995). Fat metabolism during exercise. Sports Science Exchange, 8(6):59.

Try The Award-Winning Jefit App Today!

Jefit app was named best app for 2020 and 2021 by PC MagazineMen’s HealthThe Manual and the Greatist. The app comes equipped with a customizable workout planner and training log. The app has ability to track data, offer audio cues, and features to share workouts with friends. Take advantage of Jefit’s exercise database for your strength workouts. Visit our members-only Facebook group. Connect with like-minded people, share tips, and advice to help get closer to reaching your fitness goals. Try one of the new interval-based workouts and add it to your weekly training schedule. Stay strong with Jefit as you live your sustainable fitness lifestyle.

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Want a Healthier Diet? Have a Feel for Macronutrients

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In life everyone hopes to achieve their ideal body type and look and feel as confident as can be. Confidence can play a role in the way we look. This is because we have an image of ourselves which cannot be shaken. If you want to be more confident and happy in life, choosing a healthier lifestyle will only help your cause. Healthy nutrition, and understanding macronutrients in particular, is a major component in living a healthy, sustainable lifestyle.

You probably know someone who uses some form of macronutrient counting. Like the macrobiotic school states, “it is about a way of life, making sure everything is balanced in your body each day.” Macronutrient might not be a word you have heard of before. You will likely be familiar, though, with the three types of macronutrients we eat each day: carbohydrates, protein and fat. This article looks at each macro, what it does for the body, and how we can balance them to improve our diet.

Carbohydrate

If you ask anyone what their favorite food or meal is, it is pretty much guaranteed that carbs are involved. Most meals revolve around the comfort of carbohydrates such as bread, pasta and wheat. Carbohydrates are a type of substance which are found in many different foods. Once broken down, they are converted into energy for the body. Sugar is a type of simple carbohydrate. It metabolizes to form energy and gives us the ability to run around and stay awake through the day.

The macronutrient, carbohydrate in particular, has gotten a bad wrap over the years. As a result, many people won’t even eat carbs now. They fear what they will do to their body. So, let us just stop right there… carbs are good for you. Your brain utilizes carbs on a daily basis for fuel (about 120 grams a day). Without carbohydrates you wouldn’t have the energy to get out of bed, solve math problems or workout. We need carbs to live, so make sure you let yourself eat them! It basically comes down to eating more healthy, complex carbs and less highly processed carbs.

Protein

Protein has become less of a macro in recent years as a buzzword for health enthusiasts the world over. Let’s just make things clear here: protein won’t solve all of your problems. In fact, too much protein isn’t a good thing. We all need a healthy dose of protein in our diet each day. Each meal should contain some form of protein. Typically, 25-35 grams of protein in each meal is a good goal. The role of protein in the body is to create and maintain muscle cells and to keep us strong.

There are many reason why many people who train have protein powder. Usually it’s because protein heals injured muscles and keeps them strong enough to train more often each week. Another job which protein handles, that you may not have realized, is to transport hemoglobin around your body. Hemoglobin picks up oxygen atoms from the air we breathe and transports them to our cells. So basically, a low protein intake can have a huge effect on your oxygen intake. In the gym world, this is probably the most important macronutrient in many eyes.

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Tasty and healthy oatmeal with berry, flax seeds and nuts. Healthy breakfast. Proper nutrition.

Fat

Fat is a part of the body which most of us spend our time trying to lose, so the idea of putting more of it into our bodies each day might just seem like a crazy idea. However, fat is just as important as any other substance in the body and as long as we reach for healthy fats we can still keep a slim and toned figure.

Fat makes up our cell membranes, it’s improves our brain function and nerve system and it can also help us to absorb certain vitamins which are fat soluble. Healthy hat has a lot more to offer for the body than you may think and it is because of this that we should eat a small amount of fat each day. By adding foods such as nuts, oily fish and avocado to your meals you will be providing the body with the fat it needs to function happily.

How to Count Macronutrients

Counting your macros involves thinking about everything you are going to eat during the day and splitting this into your carbs, protein and fat. Think of it like a pie chart and make sure, as an example, that approximately 50 percent of what you eat comes from healthy carbs, 30 percent from protein and 20 percent is fat. You can adjust these amounts slightly to gain more protein and less fat, but as a rule this is a helpful guide to follow.

For example, if you are a female using a calorie count of approximately 1,600 in order to lose some weight, your calories per macronutrient should be similar to these values:

Carbohydrates – 800 calories (divide by 4 to determine the number of gram to eat for the day = 200)

Protein- 480 calories (120 grams)

Fat- 320 calories (divide by 9 to determine the number of grams = 36)

A quick example for a male, looking to drop weight, a calorie count for say 2,700 calories would look like:

Carbohydrate – 1,350 calories (338 grams/day)

Protein – 810 calories (202 grams)

Fat – 540 calories (60 grams)

Keep in mind, these are just rough examples. You are not always going to count your calories each day but having a better understanding where the calories are coming from and how much of each macronutrient you’re consuming can only help on the nutrition side.

A helpful way to keep on track of the macros which you eat is to use an app such as MyFitnessPal which counts your calories for your meals by ingredient. You can see much more clearly where you need to make changes in terms of your ratios. Counting macros this way will allow you to stay healthy and it will also ensure that you maintain your ideal bodyweight too.

Use Jefit to Record and Track All Your Exercise Needs

Jefit is a strength training app used for planning & tracking workouts and helps all gym goers and athletes keep on track with their fitness goals. Not only does it offer you the ability to update and share your workout log with a supportive community, it has the largest exercise library that covers both weight training and cardio.

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5 Popular Exercise Programs Featured on the Jefit App

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There are currently more than two thousand exercise programs featured on the award-winning Jefit app. Rather than cycle through each page on the app or website to find “some” of the more popular program in “General Fitness”, we’ve done the leg work for you. The website breaks down the total number of programs into beginner, intermediate and advanced level. Programs are placed in one of four categories (see below). In this blog post, though, we’ll focus on the first category only. After the title of each programs, you’ll find the total number of downloads and views for that particular program as well as a brief synopsis.

Jefit Exercise Sub-Group Listings

FitBody Plan (Downloads / Views: 139 / 16,123) Intermediate Level
Description

This intermediate exercise program offers two training sessions that can be done 1-2x/week. Meaning, two session or repeat for 4 sessions/week taking a rest day between each workout. The goal of this plan is to build a general base-level of strength across all major muscle groups.

The program routine includes two training sessions that look like this. On Day 1, you’ll focus on the legs, back, core, and chest. While Day 2 targets the shoulders, core, and arms.

Nutrition Tips

Really pay attention to your diet while following this exercise program. Eat whole foods while consuming plenty of healthy carbs, fat, fiber and at least 1 gram of protein/kilogram of body weight. Supplement meals and all workouts with a whey protein drink. Make sure it contains the amino acid – Leucine in it. Use 30-40 grams/protein in any protein drink. Drink plenty of H2O and get 7-8 hours of sleep.

Bodyweight Home Circuit – Level 1 (Downloads / Views: 88 / 15,887) Beginner Level
Program Description

This is a good first step to take if you’re looking to start an exercise program. All exercises featured in this two day a week routine utilize only bodyweight.

As with any new exercise program or when you’re coming to the game with minimal experience- “always err on the side of caution.” Meaning move slowly through the routine and make sure you’re warmed up before starting.

This program has only two circuits or rounds – compared to three – found in Level 2 and 3 of this program. When this routine becomes less challenging for you – progress to Level 2. Good luck – be well and stay strong!

Dumbbell-Only Full Body Home Workout (Downloads / Views: 9,165 / 600,809) Beginner Level
Description

For many individuals they aren’t able to afford a gym membership or aren’t able to get to a gym; thus this routine provides a full-body, 3 day split where an individual can target all of their body parts and either gain/maintain muscle mass. It focuses upon heavy lifts and around 3 to 4 sets with 10 reps per set to increase muscle mass and gaining during exercise performance.

Machine Only Beginner Workout (Downloads / Views: 7,343 / 445,391) Beginner Level
Description

This is a machine-only beginner workout for those who are just starting to get into the gym, only have machine equipment or possibly for those who feel intimidated going into a gym. Exercise machines are great for isolating the muscles and allowing the individual to use a weight that they feel comfortable with to achieve the results that they desire.

This routine is to be performed 3 days a week, as it is a beginner routine, and there are 3 separate whole body workouts that an individual can use on the days that they workout. Each exercise chosen targets and isolates the muscle that is being performed to help build strength and achieve muscle growth or toning (depending on what the individual is trying to attain with their workout).

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Getting Ripped (Downloads / Views6,576 / 160,196) Advanced Level
Description

This is a 5-day exercise program will help build muscle while also shedding off unwanted poundage to get ripped.

On Mondays/Wednesday and Fridays you will be targeting your chest and arms. The only change in the routine that you will see is that for each day, the chest exercise changes from flat bench to incline bench to decline bench. This is done so thatyou hit all of the individual parts of the chest muscle throughout your workout routine. For Tuesdays and Thursdays, the main focus will be targeting the back and leg muscles through the use of major muscle building exercises. Saturdays and Sundays are used as rest days to provide proper rest time for the following weeks worth of exercises.

Program

As this is a muscle building and strength gaining routine, the main focus is to perform around 10 to 12 reps per set and doing about 3 to 4 sets per exercise. This will ensure optimal muscle growth as well as calorie burn for fat loss.

You aren’t performing each exercise individually but you are performing every exercise in a super-set. So the first two exercise in the workout day are in a super-set, followed by a 3 + 4, 5 + 6, 7 + 8, 9 + 10, 11 + 12 and then finished by cardio. Performing super-sets throughout the entire routine will keep your heart rate and intensity up throughout your entire workout, thus triggering muscle growth and fat loss.

Additional Information

Cardio is performed at the end of each routine to increase the amount of calories burned for the overall workout. This will help you attain that ripped look that you desire. Intensity is key throughout this entire workout, this is why we keep the rest time to around 15 to 30 seconds so that you are always keeping your heart rate up and consistently lifting weights.

As to any cutting routine, diet is KEY. You need to eat a healthy, clean and strict diet to maintain proper calorie intake to stimulate the fat loss you are looking for. Heavy carbs and processed foods should be stayed away from at all costs while trying to lose weight. You can have a carb heavy meal once a week to help spark an increase in metabolic rate.

Use Jefit App for All Your Exercise Needs

Jefit is a strength training app used for planning & tracking workouts. It also helps gym goers and athletes keep on track with their fitness goals. Not only does it offer you the ability to update and share your workout log with a supportive community, it has the largest exercise library that covers both weight training and cardio.

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Three Key Requirements for Muscle Growth to Occur

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There are three key requirements in order for muscle growth to occur. To ensure muscles grow, known as hypertrophy, you need an appropriate training stimulus. In addition, proper diet with adequate protein and of course plenty of sleep. A fourth factor, not discussed here, is the important role that genetics play. We all know people who train hard, eat well and get plenty of sleep. They typically get stronger but don’t really pack on lean muscle. There are many variables that can effect (1) how much and (2) how quickly your body responds to training and eventually adds muscle. This will depend on age, gender, genetic and hormonal factors. There is a saying out there when talking about the role genetics play: “If you want an Olympic athlete then you need Olympic parents.”

Appropriate Training Stimulus for Muscle Growth?

How do you stimulate muscle growth? When a persons muscles are challenged they adapt and change over time. Changes are dependent on the type of activity and types of muscle fibers used, the load exerted on the muscle, and the velocity and duration of the contraction. (Marieb, 2004) The point is to push through all your workouts, especially a heavy day. Because muscular growth or hypertrophy can only be accomplished through these adaptations and changes. “It takes about 16 workouts to have a noticeable ‘superficial’ effect. There is simply no other recipe to do this in a healthy, orderly, and long-lasting manner.” Try using the Jefit, a workout planner & tracker app to record all your workouts.

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Is the Current RDA for Protein High Enough?

This is a tough area for a lot of people. Their eating habits are just not where they need to be. In addition to eating well-balanced, highly nutritious meals, protein intake needs to be sufficient. If not, muscle growth to say the least, will be difficult if not impossible. The scientific research has shown different results over the years in terms of protein needs.

The question we should ask ourselves is – should we follow the suggested RDA of 0.8 grams/kg/day for protein intake or is it more in line with 1-2 gram/kg/day? The answer may depend partly on the volume of daily exercise you’re doing, if you’re a strength or an endurance athlete, and your age.

Adequate Nutritional Intake (Especially Protein)

A classic study was done in 1988 at the USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University in Boston. I was actually one of the younger test subjects in that particular study. The team headed by Meredith and colleagues, looked at the protein needs of 12 subjects. Six were young (26.8 +/- 1.2 yr) and six were middle-aged (52.0 +/- 1.9 yr) endurance-trained men. All subjects consumed either 0.6, 0.9, or 1.2 grams/kg/day of high-quality protein over three separate 10-day periods. They did this while maintaining their training and a constant body weight. The results of the study estimated that protein requirement was 0.94 +/- 0.05 grams/kg/day for the 12 men. The data from the study showed endurance exercise was associated with a specific dietary protein requirement. These needs were actually greater than the current recommended dietary allowance of 0.8 g/kg/day.

Since then, there have been several studies on individuals who engaged in regular aerobic exercise. The exercise, more vigorous in nature, demonstrated a higher protein need more in line with 1.1 to 1.4 grams/kg/day. This by the way is about 38-75 percent above the current RDA range. There is good evidence that the current recommended protein intake may actually limit muscle growth. This was seen in a study published in the Journal Applied Physiology. Some researcher’s report an optimal intake more in line with a protein range of 1.5 to 1.8 grams/kg/day which is 88 to 125 percent above the suggested RDA. The best way to make this happen is by ingesting 25-30 grams/protein with each meal and of course supplement with a post recovery protein drink.

Optimal Recovery (Sleep)

You can have the two other two boxes checked but if adequate sleep is not happening, muscle growth will not occur. For those individuals training extremely hard, periodic naps may also be needed. As training intensity increases, more recovery and sleep is needed. According to the National Sleep Foundation (NSF), we need 7-9 hours of uninterrupted sleep each night. Are you getting that? When this happens on a regular basis for you, you can check that third box. Here are their guidelines for recommended amounts of sleep by the NSF.

  • Teenagers (14-17): Sleep range widened by one hour, compared to younger children, to 8-10 hours.
  • Younger adults (18-25): Sleep range is 7-9 hours (new age category).
  • Adults (26-64): Sleep range did not change and remains 7-9 hours.
  • Older adults (65+): Sleep range is 7-8 hours (new age category).

Key Take Aways

Increasing strength and building muscle can often seem like a full-time job. You will need all the help you can get to make this happen, especially on the fronts discussed here. By checking all three boxes (training/nutrition/sleep), your odds of finally adding lean muscle will improve greatly. Be well and stay Strong!

Use Jefit to Record & Track Your Workouts

Jefit is a strength training app used for planning & tracking workouts and helps all gym goers and athletes keep on track with their fitness goals. Not only does it offer you the ability to update and share your workout log with a supportive community, it has the largest exercise library that covers both weight training and cardio.

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4 Great Core Exercises You’re Probably Not Doing on Jefit

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The reason why the blog title includes “you’re probably not doing” is because each of these core exercises have been downloaded only a few thousand times. More popular exercises, found in the Jefit app exercise database, have been downloaded 1-2 million times. Take a look at each one and see if one or more works for you. Before you do that see how many of the five exercises below have been in any of your recent Jefit strength programs that you built or tried. These are the five most popular core exercises, all have more than one million downloads to date.

Each core exercise listed above is beneficial when performed correctly. Now, take a look at the core exercises mentioned below and let us know, in the Jefit community, if you agree about their value. If not for you, what other exercises would recommend to a Jefit user.

Dragon Flag

The dragon flag is considered an “expert” level exercise in the Jefit database. This challenging movement has been downloaded only 3,244 times to date. The exercise is shown first in the series of photos below.

How to Perform:

1.) Start off laying on a decline or flat bench and grabbing the end of it behind your head with both hands.

2.) Squeeze and create tension throughout your body so that you are able to feel your muscles and abdominals tighten

3.) Then from the starting position swing your feet upward so that your body is almost vertical.

4.) Keep your abdominals tight and your entire body as straight as possible as you are pointed up in the air.

5.) Hold this position for as long as possible, squeezing your muscles and abs as much as you can.

6.) Once you complete your repetition, slowly lower your feet towards the floor in a controlled manner.

Trainer Notes:

– It is important to brace your core prior to attempting all of these core exercises. You need to maintain this throughout the duration of the movement.

Oblique Crunches with Bench

This exercise, also known as elevated side bridge, in another efficient core exercise. This will work your obliques and also your deep back muscles, like your quadratus lumborum. The oblique crunch with bench, again, has been downloaded minimally (3,618) so let’s change that (exercise is shown in middle photo).

How to Perform:

1.) Start by placing a flat bench in front of you, then rest one are on the bench while extending your legs out, one foot on top of the other, in front of you until your body is parallel with the floor.

2.) While keeping your arms rested on the bench, elevate your body through your pelvis as this will be your starting position.

3.) From there lower your pelvis down towards the floor until you feel a stretch in your abdominals.

4.) Hold onto this position for a count then return back to the starting position.

5.) Repeat for as many reps and sets as desired.

6.) Switch sides and repeat.

Trainer Tip:

– It is important to make sure that your legs stay extended out in front of you and arm stays rested on the bench.

– The only movement that you want to make is within your obliques and pelvis as they extend down towards the floor and back up with each repetition.

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Plank with Side Kick

The third and final exercise is one of the best anti-flexion core exercises, plank with side kick. The exercise has been downloaded 4,061 times to date. Keep in mind when you perform this movement. The exercise is shown third in the series of photos.

How to Perform:

1.) Start off on your hands and toes in a modified push up position.

2.) Take one of your legs and bring them out to the side of your body, keeping it parallel to the floor, and hold for a few seconds.

3.) After feeling a stretch in your core, bring the leg back to the center and then return to the floor.

4.) Repeat this motion with the opposite leg and alternate.

Trainer Tip:

– There should be no movement in your hips or back, other than hip abduction with a straight leg, when executing the movement.

Push Up to Side Plank

The push up to side plank is a personal favorite. It is one of those core exercises that offers a lot of bang for the buck. The movement targets the chest, core and shoulder. The end phase of the exercise is shown above in the blog post main photo. The exercise has been downloaded only 2,930 times. It is a fantastic bodyweight exercise that you can add to any circuit or interval program on the app.

How to Perform:

1.) Start off in a push up position on the floor with your toes extended out and arms at shoulder level.

2.) Once in position perform a push up and then quickly come back up, but shift your weight to one side of your body twisting to one side and bringing the arm on the twisted side up towards the ceiling.

3.) Hold this position for a count then return back to the starting position for another push up.

4.) Repeat for as many repetitions and sets as desired.

Trainer Tip:

– Hand placement is important for this exercise because immediately following the push up phase you’ll go into an extended side plank. Also, keep your head in alignment throughout.

Try one of these four or another core exercise, that you have not previously tried, in your next Jefit strength training program.

Record & Track Your Core Exercises Using Jefit App

Jefit app was named best app for 2020 and 2021 by PC MagazineMen’s HealthThe Manual and the Greatist. The app comes equipped with a customizable workout planner and training log. The app has ability to track data, offer audio cues, and features to share workouts with friends. Take advantage of Jefit’s exercise database for your strength workouts. Visit our members-only Facebook group. Connect with like-minded people, share tips, and advice to help get closer to reaching your fitness goals. Try one of the new interval-based workouts and add it to your weekly training schedule. Stay strong with Jefit as you live your sustainable fitness lifestyle.

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Know the Health Benefits from Regular Strength Training

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Currently, more than 83 percent of people living in Colorado exercise on a regular basis. There are a few other states that also top that 80 percent mark, like Hawaii, Utah and Vermont. With that, many states are still not even close to that percentage. Understanding the many benefits of strength training could hopefully get more people to jump on the band wagon.

On average, we spend just two hours per week being physically active. This according to researchers at Penn State and the University of Maryland, who analyzed data from the US Census Bureau. According to the latest CDC data, only about 23 percent of U.S. adults get the recommended amount of exercise each week (150-minutes a week). Here are just a few of the many health benefits you’ll receive from strength training on a regular basis.

Benefits of Strength Training

Duke University scientists discovered that 1,100 calories expended through weekly exercise can help prevent the accumulation of visceral adipose tissue. This type of tissue is dangerous because belly fat causes arterial inflammation and hypertension. Need a push? A British Medical Journal study reported people who exercised in groups boosted their average calorie burn by 500 calories a week.

University of Michigan scientists found men who completed three total-body strength workouts each week experienced significant health changes. The study lasted 2 months and subjects lowered their diastolic blood pressure by 8 points. That is enough to reduce your risk of stroke by 40 percent and heart attack by 15 percent.

Individuals who exercise, at any intensity level, for 2 hours a week see positive changes in mental health. That is an average of only 17 minutes a day. This group was 61 percent less likely to feel highly stressed than their sedentary counterparts, according to researchers from Denmark.

People who regularly participate in strength training are about 20 to 30 percent less likely to become obese. Individuals who performed 1–2 hours a week or at least 2 days a week of resistance exercise, had a 20–30 percent reduced risk of obesity, even after adjusting for aerobic exercise. Researchers at Iowa State University, and other institutions, decided to look at the relationship, if any, between weights and waistlines. They observed tens of thousands of patients who visited the Cooper Clinic in Dallas between 1987 and 2005. Subjects who worked out aerobically and lifted weights were much less likely to become obese. But so were those who lifted almost exclusively and reported little, if any, aerobic exercise.

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Additional Health Benefits

A new study out of the University of South Wales, looked at the strength of younger adults (18-50). The data suggests that men and women can achieve similar relative muscle size gains. In this meta analysis (30 studies), females actually gained more relative lower-body strength than males. Males gained more absolute upper-body strength, absolute lower-body strength, and absolute muscle size.

In a 2014 study published in the journal Obesity, Harvard researchers followed 10,500 men over the course of 12-years and found that strength training was more effective at preventing increases in abdominal fat than cardiovascular exercise.

A 2013 research in the Journal of Applied Physiology demonstrated young men who did strength training hd a better-functioning HDL, or good cholesterol, compared with those who never lifted weights.

Finally, probably the most important benefit of strength training is a longer life span. A 2015 study in The Lancet showed that grip strength accurately predicted death from any cause. A 2017 report in Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition & Metabolic Care suggests that muscle strength and lean muscle mass both serve as better measures of someones overall health than body mass index or BMI. Time to rethink BMI.

Use the Award-Winning Jefit App

Jefit is a strength training app used for planning & tracking workouts. It also helps gym goers and athletes keep on track with their fitness goals. Not only does it offer you the ability to update and share your workout log with a supportive community, it has the largest exercise library that covers both weight training and cardio.

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Compound Exercises are Best Choice for a Strong Body

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When you’re looking to increase muscle size and build strength, incorporating more compound strength exercises into your routine would be prudent. Research studies have demonstrated compound exercises are superior compared to other types of exercise. In fact, a 2017 study published in Frontiers in Physiology looked at exercise subjects who used compound versus isolation exercises over an eight-week period. The study showed that the group who focused on compound strength exercises had greater gains in both strength and VO2 max. A second study published in 2019, also supports the use of multi-joint (MJ) over single-joint (SJ) exercises when looking to improve strength in this case, in the lower body. Researchers reported significant strength increases in both SJ and MJ groups, but the MJ group saw significantly greater increases in 1-RM for all leg exercises that were tested in the study.

What Are Compound Strength Exercises?

Compound exercises are multi-joint movements that work several muscles or muscle groups at one time (ACSM). An example would be a Barbell Squat which works many muscle groups like the core, legs, hips and back. Another example would be a Bench Press exercise which works the muscles that make up the chest, shoulders and arms. Compound strength exercises are a staple in many exercise programs because they are ideal for building strength and adding size. In addition, a compound exercise will recruit more muscle fiber and in turn burn more calories per minute than a single-joint or isolation exercise. Compound exercises can be performed using body weight, exercise bands, dumbbells or your best option a barbell. This is because the average gym-goer can lift 20% more weight using a barbell compared to dumbbells. Compound exercise are also important because they mimic activities of daily living (ADL’s).

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Sport, fitness, training and happiness concept – sporty woman with barbell in gym

Examples of Compound & Isolation Type Exercises

Compound (Multi-joint) ExercisesIsolation (Single-joint) Exercises
SquatLeg Extension
DeadliftLeg Curl
Bent-Over RowTricep Extension
Military PressDumbbell Side Lateral Raise
Pull-UpsBicep Curl
Bench Press Dumbbell Chest Fly

What are Isolation Strength Exercises?

Isolation exercises work only one muscle or muscle group and only one joint at a time (ACSM). Examples of isolation exercises include the Biceps Curl or a Leg Extension exercise.

Combining both mult-joint barbell and single-joint dumbbell exercises in a workout has been shown to work well. This type of combination can be seen in the new Jefit program, Compound Strength Routine. Many machine-based strength training products are designed with isolation exercises in mind. Some research has shown, however, that an isolation or single-joint exercise, like a biceps curl, can increase muscle hypertrophy more than a multi-joint exercise.

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An example of an isolation exercise, Dumbbell Bicep Curl.

Jefit’s New Compound Strength Routine

A new advanced strength program designed around multi-joint exercises is the Jefit Compound Strength Routine. The 3-day, advanced, strength training program includes 9-10 strength exercises in each workout. The routine offers three different strength programs, using barbell and dumbbells, and includes 1-3 supersets in each exercise session. This type of program design makes for a faster workout and in turn keeps all the session times less than an hour. Stay Strong with Jefit!

Use Jefit to Keep Track of all Your Workouts

Jefit is a strength training app used for planning & tracking workouts and helps all gym goers and athletes keep on track with their fitness goals. Not only does it offer you the ability to update and share your workout log with a supportive community, it has the largest exercise library that covers both weight training and cardio.

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Most Popular Jefit Exercise for Major Muscle Groups

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The following list includes the top 12 most popular exercises for each muscle group currently used on the Jefit app. The list was put together based on exercise popularity which equates to the most downloads. The ranking (1-12) in each column, shows the number of times each exercise has been downloaded over the past decade. This list includes only barbell, dumbbell and machine exercises, not bodyweight, kettlebell or exercise band.

The list was generated to help anyone who uses the award-winning Jefit app build their strength programs more easily. The Jefit app currently includes about 1300 exercises.

*Each column below includes the following format: Barbell (left), Dumbbell (middle), and Machine-based exercises (right).*

Most Downloaded Leg Exercises

  • Barbell Squat
  • Barbell Lunge
  • Barbell Full Squat
  • Barbell Front Squat
  • Barbell Stiff-Leg Deadlift
  • Barbell Hack Squat
  • Barbell Clean Deadlift
  • Barbell Clean
  • Barbell Front Squat
  • Barbell Wide Stance Squat
  • Barbell Step Up
  • Barbell Single Leg Squat
  • Dumbbell Lunges
  • Dumbbell Squat
  • Dumbbell Step Up
  • Dumbbell Walking Lunge
  • Dumbbell Rear Lunge
  • Dumbbell Stiff-Leg Deadlift
  • Dumbbell Pile Squat
  • Dumbbell Bench Squat
  • Dumbbell Iron Cross
  • Dumbbell Lateral Lunge w/ Bicep Curl
  • Dumbbell Jump Squat
  • Dumbbell Single Leg Squat
  • Prone Leg Curl
  • Leg Extension
  • Leg Press
  • Seated Leg Curl
  • Smith Machine Squat
  • Hack Squat
  • Thigh (Hip) Abduction
  • Thigh (Hip) Adduction
  • Cable Standing Leg Curl
  • Smith Machine Stiff-Leg Deadlift
  • Machine Squat
  • Leg Press (Narrow Stance)

Best Back Exercise

  • Barbell Deadlift
  • Bent Over Row
  • T-Bar Row
  • Romanian Deadlift
  • Barbell Good Morning
  • Reverse Grip Bent Over Row
  • Barbell Pullover
  • Barbell Bent Over One-Arm Row
  • Barbell Inverted RowRack Pulls
  • Incline Bench Row
  • Lying Cambered Row
  • Reverse Grip Incline Row
  • Dumbbell One-Arm Row
  • Dumbbell Bent Over Row
  • Deadlift
  • Back Shrug
  • Palms In Bent Over Row
  • Pullover on Stability Ball
  • Lying Rear Deltoid Row
  • Palm rotational Row
  • One-Arm Pullover
  • Reverse Grip Incline Row
  • One-Arm Lying Rear Row
  • One-Arm Row on Stability Ball
  • Wide Grip Lat Pulldown
  • Cable Seated Row
  • Back Hyperextension
  • Close Grip Front Lat Pulldown
  • Wide Grip Behind Head Pulldown
  • Cable V Bar Pulldown
  • Cable Straight Arm Pushdown
  • Cable Underhand Pulldown
  • Smith Machine Deadlift
  • Seated Machine Row
  • T Bar Lying Row
  • Smith Machine Bent Over Row

Top Chest Exercise

  • Barbell Bench Press
  • Incline Bench Press
  • Decline Bench Press
  • Wide Grip Bench Press
  • Front Raise and Pullover
  • Wide Grip Decline Press
  • Barbell Neck Press
  • Decline Pullover
  • Wide Grip Decline Pullover
  • Pullover and Press
  • One Arm Floor Press
  • Reverse Grip Incline Bench
  • Dumbbell Bench Press
  • Incline Press
  • Dumbbell Fly
  • Incline Fly
  • Straight Arm Pullover
  • Dumbbell Deep Push Up
  • Bent Arm Pullover
  • Hammer Grip Incline Bench
  • Decline Press
  • Incline Fly w/ Twist
  • Around the World
  • One Arm Bench Press
  • Machine Fly
  • Cable Crossover
  • Machine Bench Press
  • Incline Chest Press
  • Smith Machine Bench Press
  • Cable Lower Chest Raise
  • Machine Butterfly
  • Smith Machine Incline Bench
  • Cable Incline Fly
  • Inner Chest Press
  • Decline Chest Press
  • Leverage Incline Chest Press
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Dumbbell Lateral Raise
  • Barbell Shoulder Press
  • Barbell Shrug
  • Upright Row
  • Standing Military Press
  • Front Raise
  • Shrug Behind the Back
  • Push Press
  • Clean and Jerk
  • Seated Military Press
  • Bradford Rocky Press
  • Rear Deltoid Row
  • Standing Front Raise Overhead
  • Dumbbell Lateral Raise
  • Shoulder Press Shoulder Shrug
  • Front Raise
  • Arnold Press
  • Standing Press
  • Bent Over Deltoid Raise
  • Upright Row
  • Reverse Flyes
  • Seated Side Lateral Raise
  • Lying Rear Lateral Raise
  • Standing Alternating Front Raise
  • Cuban Press
  • Machine Shoulder Press
  • Machine Shrug
  • Overhead Shoulder Press
  • Machine Upright Row
  • Cable Upright Row
  • Cable Lateral Raise
  • Cable Front Raise
  • Reverse Flyes
  • Cable Sgrug
  • Cable Standing Deltoid Raise
  • Cable Internal Rotation
  • Cable Rope Rear Deltoid Row

Most Often Used Arm Exercises (top 6 Bicep/Tricep exercises)

  • Barbell Curl
  • Preacher Curl
  • Drag Curl
  • Standing Wide Grip Bicep Curl
  • Standing Close Grip Bicep Curl
  • Bicep Curl Lying Against an Incline
  • ———————————
  • Barbell Lying Tricep Extension
  • Close Grip Bench Press
  • Barbell Lying Tricep Press
  • Seated Overhead Tricep Extension
  • Reverse Tricep Bench Press
  • Close Grip Behind Neck Press
  • Dumbbell Alternating Hammer Curl
  • Alternating Bicep Curl
  • Bicep Curl
  • Hammer Curl
  • Alternating Incline Curl
  • Dumbbell Zottman Curl
  • ————————
  • Standing Tricep Extension
  • Tricep Kickback
  • Lying Tricep Extension
  • One Arm Tricep Extension
  • Alternating Kickback
  • Dumbbell Tate Press
  • Machine Bicep Curl
  • Cable Close Grip Curl
  • Preacher Curl
  • Cable Standing Bicep Curl
  • Cable One Arm Bicep Curl
  • Cable Reverse Curl
  • ———————-
  • Machine Dip
  • Cable Rope Tricep Extension
  • Cable Tricep Pushdown
  • Cable Rope Overhead Tricep Extension
  • Pushdown V Bar
  • Weighted Tricep Dip

Core Exercises

  • Barbell Ab Rollout on Knees
  • Barbell Seated Twist
  • Barbell Standing Rollout
  • Barbell Side Bend
  • Barbell Press Sit Up
  • Dumbbell Side Bend
  • Two Arm Side Bend
  • Wood Chop
  • Alternating Prone Cobra (Stability Ball)
  • Standing One Leg Cobra
  • Machine Decline Crunch
  • Cable Crunch
  • Ab Crunch Machine
  • Knee Hip Raise on Parallel Bars
  • Cable Wood Chops
  • Cable Side Bends
  • Cable Kneeling Pulldown
  • Cable Russian Twist
  • Cable Seated Crunch
  • Parallel Bar Leg Raise
  • Cable One Arm High Pulley Side Bend
  • Cable Pallof Press with Rotation

Final Thoughts

As a Jefit member, look to use some of these great exercises in your future strength workouts. There are many hidden gems making up this list that should be rated even higher, like cable pallof press with rotation. This is considered an excellent anti-rotational core exercise. Another key exercise to use is cable internal rotation. Not making the list is cable internal rotation. Perform both of these rotator cuff exercises in your next workout using a lighter weight and higher repetition count. A great exercise that is also low on the list is barbell step up – try this great compound leg movement in a future strength program as well. Stay Strong with Jefit!

Use Jefit to Record & Track All Your Exercises

Jefit app was named best app for 2020 and 2021 by PC MagazineMen’s HealthThe Manual and the Greatist. The app comes equipped with a customizable workout planner and training log. The app has ability to track data, offer audio cues, and features to share workouts with friends. Take advantage of Jefit’s exercise database for your strength workouts. Visit our members-only Facebook group. Connect with like-minded people, share tips, and advice to help get closer to reaching your fitness goals. Try one of the new interval-based workouts and add it to your weekly training schedule. Stay strong with Jefit as you live your sustainable fitness lifestyle.

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