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  1. #1
    Experienced Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
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    91
    I'm just sorting out my bulking diet now after a 3 month cut - pretty savage eating only 1,600 calories for 12 weeks! - I did have loads of fruit in it (well, 5 pieces!) but have shaved it down a bit due to fructose content - so although fresh fruit is good, I suppose it's a good idea to keep an eye on fructose intake. People seem to recommend a maximum of 20g a day of fructose (which should be okay if you're eating just fruit, but a lot of people may have a fizzy drink which is packed with the stuff).

    Some fruits are better for others - pears & apples tend to be high in it, whilst the berries tend to be low. I had to swap my pear for blueberries & strawberries !

  2. #2
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2014
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    5
    Simply superb info Robert!!

  3. #3
    Experienced Member thriveful's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    21
    Hi there

    Great infographic, but I'm not convinced it is accurate. Although there is a general paradigm that simple carbs (read high GI or high GL) are bad, it really depends on what you are doing.

    If you are sedentary, then eating lots of carbs of any sort is probably a bad idea, if we are going to assume that carbs fuel some brain heart, and nervous system function, but are not needed in any great quantities unless one is performing glycolitically demanding activities.

    Then you've got the whole thing of 'post exercise, non-insulin mediated glucose uptake', where the body will prioritise glycogen replenishment to the muscles without the presence of insulin as the storage signalling hormone.

    In these cases, high GI/GL carbs like white rice, white potato etc are exactly what you want.

    It also opens up the whole can of worms relating to GI/GL and diabetes etc. Although the general thinking suggests that people should eat low GI/GL carbs, there is definitely a question as to whether that all doay, long slow release of glucose, and the cells being almost constantly bathed in insulin, is actually worse that a short term, occasional high insulin spike from eating high GI/GL carbs. Open for debate.

    The other thing on the info graphic re blood sugar crashes from high GI etc is true. But is is only true for people who eat carbs habitually as their main source of fuel. If one changes ones eating habits, focusing on a protein/fat based breakfast, similar for lunch, and protein/fat carbs for dinner, carbs dependent on activity etc, then those blood sugar crashes disappear and one has stable energy and blood sugar through the day.

    I fast until lunchtime, but could easily not eat all day, with no blood sugar swings. I find it a much better way to condition oneslef, not being reliant on having to eat every hour or two.

    Be interested in other views.

    Regards

    Steve

  4. #4
    Junior Member jdavid25's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    8

    Cool

    excellent information!! I am very glad to know this because I am following each tip I get to improve my dieting and exercises, I recently stated taking a natural Testosterone booster from Niwali I do feel the energy, and other product to have a faster workout recovery, is that good? it's natural and I do like the effects.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by thriveful View Post
    Hi there

    Great infographic, but I'm not convinced it is accurate. Although there is a general paradigm that simple carbs (read high GI or high GL) are bad, it really depends on what you are doing.

    If you are sedentary, then eating lots of carbs of any sort is probably a bad idea, if we are going to assume that carbs fuel some brain heart, and nervous system function, but are not needed in any great quantities unless one is performing glycolitically demanding activities.

    Then you've got the whole thing of 'post exercise, non-insulin mediated glucose uptake', where the body will prioritise glycogen replenishment to the muscles without the presence of insulin as the storage signalling hormone.

    In these cases, high GI/GL carbs like white rice, white potato etc are exactly what you want.

    It also opens up the whole can of worms relating to GI/GL and diabetes etc. Although the general thinking suggests that people should eat low GI/GL carbs, there is definitely a question as to whether that all doay, long slow release of glucose, and the cells being almost constantly bathed in insulin, is actually worse that a short term, occasional high insulin spike from eating high GI/GL carbs. Open for debate.

    The other thing on the info graphic re blood sugar crashes from high GI etc is true. But is is only true for people who eat carbs habitually as their main source of fuel. If one changes ones eating habits, focusing on a protein/fat based breakfast, similar for lunch, and protein/fat carbs for dinner, carbs dependent on activity etc, then those blood sugar crashes disappear and one has stable energy and blood sugar through the day.

    I fast until lunchtime, but could easily not eat all day, with no blood sugar swings. I find it a much better way to condition oneslef, not being reliant on having to eat every hour or two.

    Be interested in other views.

    Regards

    Steve
    thanks man! really useful post

  6. #6
    Experienced Member thriveful's Avatar
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    Jul 2013
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    21
    Quote Originally Posted by cferre88_1 View Post
    thanks man! really useful post
    very welcome

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