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  1. #1

    How do you stop the Procastination?

    I'm interested to know how people stop procastination seeping into to your daily life and then subsequent gym routine. I'm a total yoyo gym user and want a more consistent long term approach. I'm too goal orientated and once my goal is met I fall off a cliff sometimes for 3-4+ months. Just looking for some tips on how others address this problem (assuming it effects you) and from those iron will types who never give up.

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Make your goal the body type you want to see in the mirror.

    There's a mental barrier you have to overcome, but at some point all of us dedicated lifters just get to the point where going to the gym is just normal every day life

  3. #3
    Senior Senior JEFIT Member is304's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    208
    A big part is showing up. Even biger part is feeling good about working out. Here are a few advises from a former yoyo gym user:

    1. Make space for your workouts. I used to work out in our garage, but after my third kid was born we had too much clutter there. I would spend 30-40 minutes after work cleaning up the space I needed, then I would decide that I've done enough for the day and skip the workout. Next time, lo and behold! all the bags and boxes were back. I would go for months without workouts, but finally I decided that I've had enough and joined a gym that's in the same building where I work. Problem solved.

    2. Make time for your workouts. To the point where you schedule it and tell everyone you're busy. Stick to your schedule.

    3. Remove obstacles. When choosing between a not so nice gym next door and a really good one 50 miles away, pick the closer one. When showing up to the gym is a chore in and of itself (such as my example with cluttered workout space) you are much less likely to show up on a regular basis.

    4. Pick something that you like. Don't work out because you have to, work out because you love to.

    5. Make it part of your daily routine. One reason why people stop exercising is an abrupt change in the daily life - getting sick, going on vacation, doing extensive home improvements, anything that takes too much of our time and effort. Once that period is over, most people fall back to the routine they are used to. If daily workouts are part of that routine, they'll go back to the gym. If they are not... they still should - and once you do it consistently for a year or so, getting back will be considerably easier.

    6. Use urgency, not guilt. Let's say, you enrolled in an aerobics class, and you skipped it for a week. Do you feel guilty that your classmates were working hard and you were not, or do you feel the urge to reconnect and work out with them? If your feelings are the former, you are much more likely to skip another week. (By the way, I lost 15 pounds in a year by no-guilt dieting. I simply ignored the days I overate and started again the next morning. This way my Thanksgiving dinner was just a large meal, not an excuse to pig out all the way to the next year. And it worked quite well.)

    7. Ignore adverse selection. If you are like me, many people in the gym will be bigger, stronger, and leaner. Don't try to measure up to them - not yet. Don't hurt yourself trying to lift as much as they do - not yet. Don't feed your ego - beat your ego. You are in the gym because you want to be better than you, not somebody else. And, if that does not work, when you step out of the gym, look at the people passing by - chances are they are smaller, weaker, and fatter than you are. You just don't see them inside (because they don't show up).

    8. Measure your progress. Set benchmarks, then beat them. This will make you feel much better about going to the gym, and will also help you beat adverse selection impact. If you can't beat them on your own, seek help.

    9. Get motivated. If you have a Facebook page (and chances are that you do), simply like some of the athletes and coaches that publish motivational messages once or twice a day. It's not that difficult to find a few of them, pick the ones you like best, and get a couple of daily reminders that working out is good for you.

    10. Get prepared. When I show up in my gym I have my jefit app running. I know exactly what exercises I'll be doing - the weights, the sets, the reps, the sequence. Get your technique right - it is very important in the long run. Select the music that you like - it does make a difference. Showing up is much easier when all you need to do is walk in and start working out.

    11. Get support. Pick people online or offline who share you interest. Keep in touch with them. They will help you when you feel like quitting. Important: don't make it one way street. Help them when they need your help too.

    12. Get addicted. When we work out our body produces a number of hormones. Some of them - dopamines and endorphines - make us feel good. Some of them make us feel bad. The proportion in which our body produces those hormones can make us more or less likely to come back. You cannot change this proportion too much, but right diet and some supplements can shift the balance. For me, I take citruline mallate on a regular basis. It neutralizes lactic acid, so my muscles don't hurt as much after workouts. Creatine works as well. Once you manage to shift your sensations during and after the workout towards good ones, you'll run back for more.

    13. Get your life in order outside of the gym. Working out is a high priority for me, but it's not the top priority. If you find that you miss working out on a regular basis, sit down and think, is there anything that stops you on a regular basis. If you spend long hours at work, you family life took turn down, you are not feeling well all the time - take care of that first.

    Well, I think that was long enough. Are you still reading? Get off you butt and go work out!
    I learned a lot from fitness books, magazines, and online articles. Most important thing I learned: you don't get fit by reading about it.

  4. #4
    Senior Member rickdennis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    116
    Quote Originally Posted by rwmclaren View Post
    I'm interested to know how people stop procastination seeping into to your daily life and then subsequent gym routine. I'm a total yoyo gym user and want a more consistent long term approach. I'm too goal orientated and once my goal is met I fall off a cliff sometimes for 3-4+ months. Just looking for some tips on how others address this problem (assuming it effects you) and from those iron will types who never give up.

    Thanks in advance.
    If you are meeting your goals and still not satisfied then you need to think BIGGER. What do you want to do, and why? Intuition and Purpose is essential to making changes to your lifestyle and is the first step. I think you are having trouble maintaining, if you are falling of the wagon so often as stated above. if you make training more apart of your life you are less apt to slip up.

    For example, my goal is competitive bodybuilding, so my whole life evolves around training and eating and sleeping appropriately to meet short and long term goals. there is no way i can slip up because it consumes me more... its like an investment u constantly monitor - If you look great and don't want to look any better, than that's different... but there is ALWAYS room for improvement lol


    Best of luck

  5. #5
    Thank you for taking the time to write such an inspiring response to my question. The very fact you and others on here have taken the time to read and respond gives me motivation. It was well informed and a metaphorical kick up the backside and validates the decision I had to post on here as initially I was hesitant. I've definitely come to the right place for help. I hope one day to return the favour to you or others on this site. I've printed off the response for myself and genuinely thank you for the advise.

    I have one quote that I find inspiring from a German philosopher (Goethe) about commitment ([url]http://quotationsbook.com/quote/7152/#sthash.jFWDxHGJ.IwfSBkUq.dpbs[/url]) that I think about a lot that might be of interest to you, not just in my procrastination about going to the gym but life in general. I am actually much more motivated and successful in other areas of my life so maybe when you say find something you enjoy.....maybe its another sport or activity for me. Either way this has given me a much needed boost especially in these winter months!

    Thanks Again

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by is304 View Post
    A big part is showing up. Even biger part is feeling good about working out. Here are a few advises from a former yoyo gym user:

    1. Make space for your workouts. I used to work out in our garage, but after my third kid was born we had too much clutter there. I would spend 30-40 minutes after work cleaning up the space I needed, then I would decide that I've done enough for the day and skip the workout. Next time, lo and behold! all the bags and boxes were back. I would go for months without workouts, but finally I decided that I've had enough and joined a gym that's in the same building where I work. Problem solved.

    2. Make time for your workouts. To the point where you schedule it and tell everyone you're busy. Stick to your schedule.

    3. Remove obstacles. When choosing between a not so nice gym next door and a really good one 50 miles away, pick the closer one. When showing up to the gym is a chore in and of itself (such as my example with cluttered workout space) you are much less likely to show up on a regular basis.

    4. Pick something that you like. Don't work out because you have to, work out because you love to.

    5. Make it part of your daily routine. One reason why people stop exercising is an abrupt change in the daily life - getting sick, going on vacation, doing extensive home improvements, anything that takes too much of our time and effort. Once that period is over, most people fall back to the routine they are used to. If daily workouts are part of that routine, they'll go back to the gym. If they are not... they still should - and once you do it consistently for a year or so, getting back will be considerably easier.

    6. Use urgency, not guilt. Let's say, you enrolled in an aerobics class, and you skipped it for a week. Do you feel guilty that your classmates were working hard and you were not, or do you feel the urge to reconnect and work out with them? If your feelings are the former, you are much more likely to skip another week. (By the way, I lost 15 pounds in a year by no-guilt dieting. I simply ignored the days I overate and started again the next morning. This way my Thanksgiving dinner was just a large meal, not an excuse to pig out all the way to the next year. And it worked quite well.)

    7. Ignore adverse selection. If you are like me, many people in the gym will be bigger, stronger, and leaner. Don't try to measure up to them - not yet. Don't hurt yourself trying to lift as much as they do - not yet. Don't feed your ego - beat your ego. You are in the gym because you want to be better than you, not somebody else. And, if that does not work, when you step out of the gym, look at the people passing by - chances are they are smaller, weaker, and fatter than you are. You just don't see them inside (because they don't show up).

    8. Measure your progress. Set benchmarks, then beat them. This will make you feel much better about going to the gym, and will also help you beat adverse selection impact. If you can't beat them on your own, seek help.

    9. Get motivated. If you have a Facebook page (and chances are that you do), simply like some of the athletes and coaches that publish motivational messages once or twice a day. It's not that difficult to find a few of them, pick the ones you like best, and get a couple of daily reminders that working out is good for you.

    10. Get prepared. When I show up in my gym I have my jefit app running. I know exactly what exercises I'll be doing - the weights, the sets, the reps, the sequence. Get your technique right - it is very important in the long run. Select the music that you like - it does make a difference. Showing up is much easier when all you need to do is walk in and start working out.

    11. Get support. Pick people online or offline who share you interest. Keep in touch with them. They will help you when you feel like quitting. Important: don't make it one way street. Help them when they need your help too.

    12. Get addicted. When we work out our body produces a number of hormones. Some of them - dopamines and endorphines - make us feel good. Some of them make us feel bad. The proportion in which our body produces those hormones can make us more or less likely to come back. You cannot change this proportion too much, but right diet and some supplements can shift the balance. For me, I take citruline mallate on a regular basis. It neutralizes lactic acid, so my muscles don't hurt as much after workouts. Creatine works as well. Once you manage to shift your sensations during and after the workout towards good ones, you'll run back for more.

    13. Get your life in order outside of the gym. Working out is a high priority for me, but it's not the top priority. If you find that you miss working out on a regular basis, sit down and think, is there anything that stops you on a regular basis. If you spend long hours at work, you family life took turn down, you are not feeling well all the time - take care of that first.

    Well, I think that was long enough. Are you still reading? Get off you butt and go work out!
    p.s... I loved the final sentence, really made me smile

  7. #7
    Experienced Member Jenluvs2sing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Buffalo, NY
    Posts
    57
    I'm a visual person and it's much easier for me to keep motivated by seeing what I've already done. I have a dry erase calendar on my kitchen door and have different colored markers for different things, green for cardio, pink for upper body workouts, and blue for lower body. I write on the calendar what I've done for that day in the corresponding colors. Since that is the door I leave by every day I can't help but see it. I hate seeing empty days! Keeping a visual record of my progress has only helped me keep going! They say it takes 21 days to create a habit, for me, it's a lot easier to keep going knowing that every day is one day closer to a lifestyle change.

    Also, hope you like this one, my favorite quote is Bruce Lee:

    "Knowing is not enough, you must apply.
    Willing is not enough, you must do."

  8. #8
    Go meet new women and have them tell you how hot your are. Its incredibly motivational.

    Or so I've been told lol....

  9. #9
    Senior Senior JEFIT Member is304's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    208
    A good article on the topic today: [url]http://www.t-nation.com/training/9-tricks-for-consistent-workouts[/url]

  10. #10

    Great read

    is304, great response that gave a me a lot to think about and some great motivation.

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