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  1. #71
    Senior Senior JEFIT Member is304's Avatar
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    Well, here comes the last post of the year. 2014 staretd extremely well for me - I was full of aspirations, seemingly on top of my game, grand plans and so on, and so forth... Ten weeks later I was diagnosed with twin SLAP tear. This was a crash landing for me and a very clear choice - give up on myself or fight like I never fought before. This was a very tough year - physically, of course, but also mentally and emotionally. I had to deal with many fears, and even now with my tendinitis on retreat, the risk of a third operation is remote, but not gone completely. I had to watch my peers excel while I was struggling to accomplish a mere tenth of what I could do. I saw my recovery slide back by a week or two every time I overexerted myself. I had a very difficult period last summer, when my right arm was immobilized in a sling and left shoulder could barely move because of really severe tendinitis, while my family was out of town and I had to take care of myself. Don't get me wrong - I'm not complaining, and I realize that many people had much harder time - but it was not an easy year.

    Yet, with all that, it was a great year because of one thing - I took ownership. I took ownership of my body. I cannot decide on my age and my past injuries, but what impact they will make on me is up to me and nobody else. I managed to keep decent body composition on my diet alone when I was unable to exercise, and it paid off - I started cardio late this fall, and the effects already are visible. I started the year being very new to manipulating my diet, and while I'm still far from perfection, improvement of my eating habits (which I viewed as something secondary a year ago) is a huge success and a key point in my recovery. I took ownership of my attitude. I must confess, I don't always succeed there, but prior to surgery I decided to stay as upbeat as possible, and when there was nobody else to cheer me up, I did it for myself. It actually works. I also did a lot of self-education. Now I know much better how my body works and how to make it work for me.

    I started the year with high aspirations, and while now my aspirations are different, they are as ambitious as a year ago.

    Instead of giving a full description of what I did in the last week and a half, I'll just give a couple of vignettes:

    I could not figure out how to do a certain exercise in my routine - a form or rotation. I tried this way and that, but my forearm and wrist would not end up in the right position. Finally the therapist showed it to me and said "watch my back". I looked carefully and realized which muscles I had to contract and in which order. Once I got it, I did it almost right from the first attempt. The exercise is very tough indeed, but now I have a chance of doing it right. Lesson I learned: instead of concentrating on a motion, concentrate on muscles that drive the motion.

    I get a kick from junk emails this season - half of them begin with "Start your New Year resolution early - lose weight with our magic diet pill!". Guess what? I'm already losing weight with my magic stationary bike.

    A few days ago my wife told my 2-year-old to pick up her toys, and she responded: "I can't - my shoulder hurts." Perhaps I was complaining too much, but I need to figure out a new reason why I cannot pick her up whenever she asks me, otherwise my biceps tendon will never recover. And not complain as much, especially as I have been feeling a lot better lately.

    There's one silver lining for being in therapy this season - I'll miss the January gym crowd. Although, I won't miss it that much.

    I got three good suggestions for the New Year resolutions. Not mine, but I found them very good, so I'll share them here.
    First - make your resolution action-oriented. You cannot always control the outcomes of your actions, but you can control the actions themselves. So, instead of adding 50 pounds of muscle, resolve to work out 40-50 minutes 5 days a week, and make sure that you spend the time actually working out, not chatting, texting, or loitering around the gym, and work on your peri-workout nutrition. You may not hit 50, but the result may surprise you nevertheless. And instead of resolving to go from 20% to 10% body fat, resolve to balance your diet and eat 1-2 serving of vegetables with every meal.
    Second - whatever you decide on, make it small. And if you achieve you goal early, set another small goal right away, without waiting for the next year.
    Third - resolve to do something nice for others: significant other, parents, kids, neighbors, friends. A little kindness goes a long way.

    As for me, I don't have any resolutions - I have plans. Step 1 - finish my physical therapy. I should be able to do it within 10 weeks, but time will tell.

    Well, I think this post is long enough, even for this occasion. Here's to hope that 2015 will be great for everyone, but if it does not - remember - our life is 90% perception, and even when you cannot control the events, you can control your response to them, and that does makes a difference.

    Happy New Year!

  2. #72
    Senior Senior JEFIT Member is304's Avatar
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    Sorry, guys, haven't update you in a while - too many things happening at once, and I wanted to put them together in a coherent story. Well, here it is:

    The main news - I'm ba-a-a-a-ack! That's right - after 285 days away from the gym, today was my first session. Now, the rest of the story in order.

    Last week I saw my surgeon, who told me I should wrap up with the physical therapy. He wanted me to quit it cold, but I spoke with my therapist and we decided that I should continue for a few weeks as I ease into regular working out. Regardless, once the surgeon told me that my shoulders are fit enough for light exercises, I joined NYSC the same day - within 6 hours (and it would be within an hour if I didn't have to get to work right away). So, if you know someone who procrastinates on the New Year resolution because {nobody does it on the first / it's the first Monday of the year that really counts / gyms are too crowded in January / I'm doing my research / whatever else } - just tell them - if you are committed, 6 hours is more than enough.

    As far as my therapy - I'm up to 6 exercises for 75-90 minute long sessions thrice a week. On two of those - the most demanding one plus a new one - I've already switched to the strongest band possible, and will make a switch to the strongest resistance on one or two more exercises within a week. Once I'll be able to do all of them comfortably with the strongest band - and that should be mid-to-late February - my therapy will officially be over. I'm going to start working arms and chest once a week too - it's time to start using my shoulders as an indirect support. The rest of the week will be legs, core, and cardio - so far steady state.

    I tried visiting local gym branch over the weekend. My wife took the car, and I traveled by bus. Unfortunately, because I was given wrong address, I ended up traveling for 4 hours (walking half the time), but did not get in the gym itself. Well, there's always next wekend, and walking outside is a decent cardio workout, but I was pretty upset anyway.

    Today, at last, was my first day in the gym. I sat down with one of the trainers, we went over my goals, and he did an assessment of my fitness. I gave it my best, but, to be honest, I used to be much better. Well, I can't get where I want to be until I find out where I am now, and not liking it is just another stimulus to work harder. So, here I am, my legs are very sore, my abs hurt from a spasm I got when working core a bit too hard, but today is the happiest day since my operation. I can't wait to start serious weight training, but now it's only matter of time and determination - and I've got both.

    Update on supplements: I've read an article on post-op recovery and fighting inflammations. One advice was to take enzymes daily - in particular proteaze - that helps dissolve scar tissue. I already do that. The second advice I got fom the article is to add NO boosters to supplements - that increases blood flow to inflamed area, and as long as the irnflammation is not extremely severe it helps. So, I added 3 grams of L-arginine to my supplement stack. It seems to work - my tendinitis is retreating - but I wish the stuff didn't taste like cheap soap.

    One smart person told me a while ago: "You know that you're healthy when every morning you wake up and the part of body that hurts is not the same as the day before." My shoulders stopped hurting when I wake up. In the past they would start hurting within an hour from waking up, now that happens every other day. I must be getting better.

    P.S. This has nothing to do with my recovery, shoulder surgery, or weightlifting, but a week ago I ran into a documentary that every parent in the US must see. It's the clip on YouTube called "The Drugging Of Our Children", and this was the first documentary in years that made me cry. If you want to know why you have to see for yourself. There is also one good advice buried in the film - many times what is interpreted as ADHD, ADD, or any other "disorder" is a sign of improper diet. So, if you have a child who is "diagnosed" with a possible disorder, first thing you should do is switch their breakfast from cereal and skim milk to something more wholesome - scrambled eggs, meat (not processed!), butter, whole milk, and instead of going with "healthy" lunch in the school cafeteria - pack your own, and make sure your child gets enough of proteins and healthy fats (saturated fat too). This movie is fairly long - and hour and 45 minutes, but if you have kids in public education system, you must know the risks they are facing.

  3. #73
    Senior Senior JEFIT Member is304's Avatar
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    Sorry, guys, haven't update you in a while - too many things happening at once, and I wanted to put them together in a coherent story. Well, here it is:

    The main news - I'm ba-a-a-a-ack! That's right - after 285 days away from the gym, today was my first session. Now, the rest of the story in order.

    Last week I saw my surgeon, who told me I should wrap up with the physical therapy. He wanted me to quit it cold, but I spoke with my therapist and we decided that I should continue for a few weeks as I ease into regular working out. Regardless, once the surgeon told me that my shoulders are fit enough for light exercises, I joined NYSC the same day - within 6 hours (and it would be within an hour if I didn't have to get to work right away). So, if you know someone who procrastinates on the New Year resolution because {nobody does it on the first / it's the first Monday of the year that really counts / gyms are too crowded in January / I'm doing my research / whatever else } - just tell them - if you are committed, 6 hours is more than enough.

    As far as my therapy - I'm up to 6 exercises for 75-90 minute long sessions thrice a week. On two of those - the most demanding one plus a new one - I've already switched to the strongest band possible, and will make a switch to the strongest resistance on one or two more exercises within a week. Once I'll be able to do all of them comfortably with the strongest band - and that should be mid-to-late February - my therapy will officially be over. I'm going to start working arms and chest once a week too - it's time to start using my shoulders as an indirect support. The rest of the week will be legs, core, and cardio - so far steady state.

    I tried visiting local gym branch over the weekend. My wife took the car, and I traveled by bus. Unfortunately, because I was given wrong address, I ended up traveling for 4 hours (walking half the time), but did not get in the gym itself. Well, there's always next wekend, and walking outside is a decent cardio workout, but I was pretty upset anyway.

    Today, at last, was my first day in the gym. I sat down with one of the trainers, we went over my goals, and he did an assessment of my fitness. I gave it my best, but, to be honest, I used to be much better. Well, I can't get where I want to be until I find out where I am now, and not liking it is just another stimulus to work harder. So, here I am, my legs are very sore, my abs hurt from a spasm I got when working core a bit too hard, but today is the happiest day since my operation. I can't wait to start serious weight training, but now it's only matter of time and determination - and I've got both.

    Update on supplements: I've read an article on post-op recovery and fighting inflammations. One advice was to take enzymes daily - in particular proteaze - that helps dissolve scar tissue. I already do that. The second advice I got fom the article is to add NO boosters to supplements - that increases blood flow to inflamed area, and as long as the irnflammation is not extremely severe it helps. So, I added 3 grams of L-arginine to my supplement stack. It seems to work - my tendinitis is retreating - but I wish the stuff didn't taste like cheap soap.

    One smart person told me a while ago: "You know that you're healthy when every morning you wake up and the part of body that hurts is not the same as the day before." My shoulders stopped hurting when I wake up. In the past they would start hurting within an hour from waking up, now that happens every other day. I must be getting better.

    P.S. This has nothing to do with my recovery, shoulder surgery, or weightlifting, but a week ago I ran into a documentary that every parent in the US must see. It's the clip on YouTube called "The Drugging Of Our Children", and this was the first documentary in years that made me cry. If you want to know why you have to see for yourself. There is also one good advice buried in the film - many times what is interpreted as ADHD, ADD, or any other "disorder" is a sign of improper diet. So, if you have a child who is "diagnosed" with a possible disorder, first thing you should do is switch their breakfast from cereal and skim milk to something more wholesome - scrambled eggs, meat (not processed!), butter, whole milk, and instead of going with "healthy" lunch in the school cafeteria - pack your own, and make sure your child gets enough of proteins and healthy fats (saturated fat too). This movie is fairly long - and hour and 45 minutes, but if you have kids in public education system, you must know the risks they are facing.

  4. #74
    Senior Senior JEFIT Member is304's Avatar
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    Sorry, guys, haven't updated you in a while - too many things happening at once, and I wanted to put them together in a coherent story. Well, here it is:

    The main news - I'm ba-a-a-a-ack! That's right - after 285 days away from the gym, today was my first session. Now, the rest of the story in order.

    Last week I saw my surgeon, who told me I should wrap up with the physical therapy. He wanted me to quit it cold, but I spoke with my therapist and we decided that I should continue for a few weeks as I ease into regular working out. Regardless, once the surgeon told me that my shoulders are fit enough for light exercises, I joined NYSC the same day - within 6 hours (and it would be within an hour if I didn't have to get to work right away). So, if you know someone who procrastinates on the New Year resolution because {nobody does it on the first / it's the first Monday of the year that really counts / gyms are too crowded in January / I'm doing my research / whatever else } - just tell them - if you are committed, 6 hours is more than enough to start.

    As far as my therapy - I'm up to 6 exercises for 75-90 minute long sessions thrice a week. On two of those - the most demanding one plus a new one - I've already switched to the strongest band possible, and will make a switch to the strongest resistance on one or two more exercises within a week. Once I'll be able to do all of them comfortably with the strongest band - and that should be mid-to-late February - my therapy will officially be over. I'm going to start working arms and chest once a week too - it's time to start using my shoulders as an indirect support. The rest of the week will be legs, core, and cardio - so far steady state.

    I tried visiting local gym branch over the weekend. My wife took the car, and I traveled by bus. Unfortunately, because I was given wrong address, I ended up traveling for 4 hours (walking half the time), but did not get in the gym itself. Well, there's always next wekend, and walking outside is a decent cardio workout, but I was pretty upset.

    Today, finally, was my first day in the gym. I sat down with one of the trainers, we went over my goals, and he did an assessment of my fitness. I gave it my best, but, to be honest, I used to be much better. Well, I can't get where I want to be until I find out where I am now, and not liking it is just another stimulus to work harder. So, here I am, my legs are very sore, my abs hurt from a spasm I got while working core a bit too hard for day 1, but today is the happiest day since my operation. I can't wait to start serious weight training, and now it's only matter of time and determination - and I've got both.

    Update on supplements: I've read an article on post-op recovery and fighting inflammations. One advice was to take enzymes daily - in particular proteaze - that helps dissolve scar tissue. I already do that. The second advice I got from the article is to add NO boosters to supplements - that increases blood flow to inflamed area, and as long as the irnflammation is not extremely severe it helps. So, I added 3 grams of L-arginine to my supplement stack. It seems to work - my tendinitis is retreating - but I only wish the stuff didn't taste like cheap soap.

    One smart person told me a while ago: "You know that you're healthy when every morning you wake up and the part of body that hurts is not the same as the day before." My shoulders stopped hurting when I wake up. In the past they would start hurting within an hour from waking up, now that happens every other day. I must be getting better.

    P.S. This has nothing to do with my recovery, shoulder surgery, or weightlifting, but a week ago I ran into a documentary that every parent in the US must see. It's the clip on YouTube called "The Drugging Of Our Children", and this was the first documentary in years that made me cry. If you want to know why you have to see for yourself. There is also one good advice buried in the film - many times what is interpreted as ADHD, ADD, or any other "disorder" is a sign of improper diet. So, if you have a child who is "diagnosed" with a possible disorder (or simply does not pay attention in school), first thing you should do is switch their breakfast from cereal and skim milk to something more wholesome - scrambled eggs, meat (not processed!), butter, whole milk, and instead of going with "healthy" lunch in the school cafeteria - pack your own, and make sure your child gets enough of proteins and healthy fats (saturated fat too). This movie is fairly long - and hour and 45 minutes, but if you have kids in public education system, you must know the risks they are facing.

  5. #75
    Experienced Member BartekWIC's Avatar
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    Congratulations! I wish you positive end of the recovery and many great workout sessions!

  6. #76
    Senior Senior JEFIT Member is304's Avatar
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    This was quite a week.
    Monday - my first day in the gym, but I already wrote about it in the previous post.

    Tuesday - my therapist said that the program I was suggested is too ambitious and gave me a couple of suggestions.

    Wednesday - my first real leg and core day. My quads were in decent shape as I've been doing cardio on stationary bike with fairly high resistance. My hamstrings didn't do that well - three days after they still hurt. So do my abs - just from doing crunches to failure.

    Thursday - several things happened. First, on therapy I accidentally grabbed a stronger band for one of the exercices where I considered myself lagging. I realized that I'm working out with the "wrong" resistance in the middle of second set, so I just kept going. So, I'm close to maxing out on 5 out of 6 exercises. Not bad at all. Then my therapist looked at the program I put togetehr based on his recommendations, made some amendments, and told me that I should do push-pull day on the same day as I do my therapy. I never thought that I'd do twice-a-day any time soon, but here I was. Life is full of surprises, and some of them are good.

    So, the biggest news was my first push-pull and arms workout last night - the first workout where shoulders are worked indirectly and may be loosened (especially with pushes) rather than tightened. The hardest part of it was to hold myself back - I wanted to go heavier. I was right to hold back though - both my shoulders are sore this morning, and the left one is loose and clicks occasionally. It started to calm down as the day goes by, and I expect it to be back to normal before my next push-pull day.

    Today I'll finish the week by cardio session - so happens my first one in a week.

    Here's the program I have now:

    Shoulders therapy (3x per week) - all with rubber band resistance
    - Lat Raises - front, diagonal, and sides - 3 sets 20 reps
    - One Arm Reverse Fly - 3x20
    - Horizontal external rotation (upper arm straight down, forearm at 90 degrees to the body, grab the band and rotate shoulder so the forearm moves outside as the upper arm is steady) - 3x20
    - Vertical rotation (upper arm to the side, forearm facing forward, grab the band and pull up) - 3x20
    Superset with push-ups from the wall
    - Band stretches in front (elbows stay at the side, move forearrms only) - 3x20
    - Band stretches overhead - 3x20

    Push-pull day (twice a week) - done slow and with lightest possibel weights - the idea is technique and activation
    - shoulder warm-up with rubber bands (2x15 of the first two exercises above)
    - machine flys - 2x20
    - cable one-arm row - 2x20
    - machine chest press (neutral grip) - 2x20
    - one-arm lat pull-downs - 2x20
    - cable curls - 2x20
    - rope pushdown - 2x20

    Legs and core (twice a week)
    Warm-up
    One-leg Glute bridge - 2x15
    Seated leg curl - 3x15
    Leg extension - 3x15
    Leg press - 3x15
    Calf rasies on leg press - 3x15
    Seated calf raise - 3x15
    Hyperextension - 3x15
    Crunches - 3x20
    Cable crunches - 3X15

    Cardio - stationary bike (5m warm up, 15m medium resistance (15 right now), 5m high resistance (21), 5m cool down). 2-3 times a week.

    As you see, nothing fancy so far, and everything is pretty light. My major task right now is to get the form right and reactivate the muscles that were inactive for a very long period. Technique is the key.

    Well, I'm off for my cardio. I'm cautiosly optimistic about my shoulders after yesterday's session, otherwise life is good. Have a great weekend everyone!

  7. #77
    Senior Senior JEFIT Member is304's Avatar
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    Sorry, guys, no update for a while. Busy at home, busy at work, and finally getting busy in the gym as well.

    The shoulders still hurt, left a little less, right a little more, but overall they are getting better. I'm still in therapy, but slowly switching from therapeutic to sport bands, and I'll have to buy a set for me to continue at home. By the way, if you never trained with bands, give them a shot.

    I mentioned that I studied various exercises while I couldn't do them. So, now I can spot improper techniques much better. I keep my mouth shut with two exceptions: upright barbell rows (that's the one that put me out of commission for 9 months) and bent back during deadlift (because that's too dangerous to look the other way). It still pains me to see people swinging dumbbells like wrecking balls when they're supposed to do curls, doing machine flyes with bent elbows (hint - the trick is to bring elbows, not the hands, as close together as possible), or swing back and during pull-downs. I think I'll switch to high intensity program as soon as I can - with shorter rest periods I concentrate on my own program and have less time to stand and look around.

    Speaking of my own program, I noticed that my biceps curls are up to 10lbs - that's the weight with which I started three years ago. Not only that, my technique is better (my elbow still inches forward at peak contraction), and the volume is higher. So, I'm back to the starting point and moving ahead. Not very inspiring, but I've been in a worse place not so long ago.

    Two more vignettes from the gym. I saw a guy take off a sauna suit (yes, they are real), and made two conclusions: first - they do work, second - none of them will be working on me. Also, I thought naked old men with towels across the shoulder are an urban legend. They are not. Unfortunately.

  8. #78
    Senior Senior JEFIT Member is304's Avatar
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    Ten months since my first surgery. I hoped to write something cheerful today, but...

    A week ago during my therapy, quite inexpectedly, I sprained a few muscles in my back, which in turn twisted a bunch of tendons in my shoulder. It hurt then, and it keeps hurting. My tendinitis on the left is back with a vengeance, and I got one on the right too, although not as severe. Back to ibuprofen.

    The therapist says this is within the norm, and suggested that I go a bit lighter on pull exercises. I hope he's right and I can fix my shoulders back where they were two weeks ago by the end of the month, but I've had so many painful setbacks in the last year, that I'm very close to giving up. I hope I'm stubborn enough to pull through and wise enough not to damage myself any further. This is very frustrating...

    On top of that I got food poisoning Sunday night and spent a day and a half in bed, which wasn't too good for my shoulders either.

    Sorry, there is nothing cheerful, witty, or informational in this post. Maybe next time.

  9. #79
    Senior Senior JEFIT Member is304's Avatar
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    What a difference does a week make! Last week I was pretty depressed, and for a good reason - my shoulders felt like it's back to square one. I still did what I had to do - exercises, medication, rest. I was no longer excited about it, I was losing hope in my recovery and the chance of another surgery seemed very real. My feelings were wrong, but my actions were right. As the result - a colossal improvement in less than 10 days. My left shoulder is still unstable - it clicks a lot, mostly because the inflammation is down and the part that was swollen is now loose. It's not very pleasant, and some motions do hurt, but a few weeks of shoulder drills should take care of it. The tendinitis on the left is way down, and most of the time I don't notice it. The one on the right became more pronounced, but under control so far. Flexibility is near pre-surgery level on both sides - a very good result indeed.

    The gym - still the same workouts - push-pull twice a week, legs twice a week, shoulders three times a week, and twice a week cardio. Yes, I do doubles twice a week. The weights are pretty light - for my chest I do dumbbell press and I just got comfortable with 10 lbs. Not impressive, but a 8 weeks ago this move was painful with any weight. I can also lift 45lb plate, so I can finally load leg press (and other machines too). Not very impressive there either - last year I was pressing 300 to 360, now I've just got 220 last night and that was an effort. It's a long road to travel, but my choice is very simple - one step at a time or none at all. I'll make it. There was one pretty important breakthrough yesterday - in my shoulder drills I switched from rubber bands to cables on one exercise. A few weeks ago my therapist mentioned cable as the last step in the recovery. I must be getting close.

    I try not to edit my posts to keep them authentic, but I decided to go back to the first one and start adding the "lessons learned" pieces - an advice to those who expect to go into surgery. So, here's the first list - soon to be added.

    Pre-surgery, once you're disagnosed and decided to go ahead with the operation:
    1. While some movements may be off-limits for you, keep working out. The speed and quality of your recovery depends on your pre-operation shape. My metabolism before the first surgery was at its peak, but it slowed down, naturally, before the second surgery. The result - slower recovery.
    2. Make sure you have a good surgeon. After my second surgery my therapist commented that people usually have swelling for a week or two, while mine was gone in three days.
    3. Physical therapy is instrumental. Surgery only starts the process, therapy is where the real work comes in. If you are not ready for therapy, you'd be better of without surgery. And yes, some of it will be painful. Very painful.
    4. Even more important than getting a good surgeon, make sure you have good physical therapist. Your surgeon will see you once after an operation, and then every 6-8 weeks. Your therapist will see you 2-3 times a week. If you can, get a specialist in sports therapy. My first therapist works mostly with office workers, most of them older people in mediocre shape. My last therapist specializes in sports medicine, and most of his clients (even office workers) are gym regulars. Both of them are excellent professionals, but the difference between the two is obvious.
    5. Don't set your recovery expectations based on what you see on the Internet - the recovery is very individual and the expectations confuse you at best. Also, don't look on the Internet for any therapy guidelines - it is very infdividual. I never did some of those YouTube exercises (in fact, we tried a few of them with my therapist and he told me NOT to do them), and some of the exercises that I was given are not found of the web, at least not as part of shoulder therapy.
    6. Prepare for a long haul. You'll be away from the gym for several months. You'll experience lots of pain for a couple of weeks. When you come back, you'll be a lot weaker, and many of your favorite exercises will be off limits. It's been 7 months since my last surgery, and it will be probably another 2-3 months or more before I do anything with barbell, could be another 6-9 months before I can attempt bench press, and I have no idea when I can start overhead persses. Remember - you will be back where you were and better, but it will take time.
    7. Have a plan. Have a goal. Make sure you have to do something once your therapy is over, something that won't leave you hanging once your therapist says that you're done, while you're still too weak and stiff to get to you pre-surgery workouts. (I made my plans, but I'm too supersticious to disclose them before I start - you'll have to wait a few weeks.)
    8. Shave your armpits. Seriously, unless your religion forbids it, shave under arms the day before the surgery, even if you've never done it, especuially if the weather is warm. There will be 4-6 weeks during which you won't be able to lift your arm. If you use spray-on deodorant, consider using gel for that time. Your family, friends, and coworkers will appreciate that.

    Well, I think this is enough for now. Hope you have a good weekend, and I'll keep pushing with my workouts.

  10. #80
    Senior Senior JEFIT Member is304's Avatar
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    Another week passed. No big changes. Tendinitis still there, but doesn't bother we as much as it used to. Therapy gets more challenging, pretty soon it will be just another workout. Speaking of workouts, I started hitting plateus, a bit sooner than I expected. I'll have to take it easy for a few days. I can hang on a horizontal bar (but not on one hand - that still hurts). In theory, I can do pull-ups, but my therapist adviced against it. I can't see my abs yet, unless I flex very hard, but the abdominal fat is now thin enough that I can feel the muscle underneath. So, small progress on a long journey. Hopefully, the same next week.

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