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Thread: Pavel's 3-5

  1. #1

    Pavel's 3-5

    3-5 movements
    3-5 reps
    3-5 sets
    3-5 minutes of rest between sets

    Basic outline

    Day A:
    Squat variation
    Vertical push
    Horizontal pull

    Day B:
    Deadlift variation
    Horizontal press
    Vertical pull


    The “non-critical thinking” version

    Day A:
    Squat
    Strict press
    Bent over row

    Day B:
    Deadlift
    Bench press
    (Weighted) Pull-up

    Method: Train 3 days week, alternating Day A and Day B each training day, with 1 day of rest in between ideally. Rest times between sets are merely suggested. If you feel ready for another set in less than 3 mintues, go ahead. For a beginner (say a 200lb male with a sub 300 deadlift), train each movement 5x5. For each movement, pick around 70% of your 5rm to start with, and every training day increase the weight.

    When you eventually are unable to do a full 5x5, do as many reps as you can in each set and count the total. If you performed in this manner

    Squats of 225
    1x5
    1x5
    1x4
    1x3
    1x3

    Then you totaled 20 reps out of your desired 25. The next time you train this movement, keep the weight the same and try for 1 more rep total. This may look like

    1x5
    1x5
    1x4
    1x4
    1x3

    Or even

    1x5
    1x5
    1x5
    1x4
    1x2

    Just as long as the total reps increase, and you don’t go above 5 reps in a set. Once you finally hit the total 25 reps via 5x5, increase the weight and start the process over again.

    Training in this style appears to be more taxing on the CNS compared to other abbreviated training methods. I theorize it’s the possibility of including heavy doubles or singles in the pursuit of the 25 reps. In either case, I’ve found that for most trainees, a deload every 3rd week is necessary of both Day A and Day B. To deload, use 70% of your total volume by altering the sets or reps.

    Example: If you had accomplished a 5x5 of 225 for squats on your previous workout, train your deload as either 3x5 or 5x3 of that weight.

    After deloading both days, you may resume training back at your normal volume. If you had previously managed 5x5 before the deload, increase the weight on your post deload workout.

    I’ve found trainees tend to burn out on these movements at around 12+ weeks, either from boredom or training stress. In either case, here’s an alternative set-up you can swap out movements with.

    Day A:
    Front squat
    Incline press
    Chest supported row

    Day B:
    Stiff legged deadlift
    (Weighed) dips
    (Weighted) chins

    From personal experience, I’ve been fine leaving the back squat and strict press and pull-up in for long rotations, but had to swap out deadlifts, flat bench, and bent over rows. Experiment and see what works for you. Do not change if you’re still making steady progress.

    I’ve found that one can stick with this program until around the time of using 400+lbs for 5 reps as a 200lb male, at which point SLDLs become more desirable. Along with that, if you find you need to deload more frequently than once every 3 weeks, you may consider reducing the reps or sets to cut down the volume. I went from 5x5 to 4x4 to eventually 3x5, and manage to still train in this style by doing so.

    While following the program, you may add accessory work if you feel it’s necessary, but keep it basic. 2x12-15 of rear delt work and abs will do the trick, performed at the end of the workout. You’re most likely going to use this as a chance to do curls. Give your arms a break and fix your shoulder imbalances instead.

  2. #2
    Would it be ok to only rest a minute between sets

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike View Post
    Would it be ok to only rest a minute between sets
    It would but eventually with heavier weight you'll want more rest time. If you keep the rest time that low it hinders progress

  4. #4
    3 to 5
    How long do you wait

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike View Post
    3 to 5
    How long do you wait
    I wait as long as it takes to recover. 3 to 5 is just a guideline. If you feel like you can get the reps for the next set then you're ready to go

  6. #6
    Can you do them in supersets

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike View Post
    Can you do them in supersets
    I wouldn't. The program is real geared towards strength gain and supersets aren't ideal for strength.

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