Advantages and Disadvantages of Doing HIIT

While we all know that finding the time for our daily exercise is important to everyone, there is much debate about what kind of exercise is best for us. Especially when it comes to cardio training. One of the more popular forms of cardio is HIIT (High Intensity Interval Training). It comes with its own set of pros and cons, though. Here is what you should know about this time saving workout.

Is HIIT Good for Me?

High intensity interval training has become a buzzword in the fitness industry, gaining momentum in popularity over the past decade. The American College of Sports Medicine published their annual report on most popular activities and HIIT has been in their top ten list or years.

This type of training has been researched often and is considered one of the best forms of exercise someone can do. Like anything else, ease into it, adding it periodically as part of your training routine.

More on HIIT

HIIT consists of shorter more intense sessions using typically 10-60 seconds of work. This is alternated with rest or light activity between bouts (this is where the interval part of the name comes in). HIIT has the potential to elevate your heart rate to 70-90 percent of your maximum heart rate, depending on your current fitness level.

The demand placed on the body for oxygen increases proportionately with the intensity level of your workout. During intense exercise, your body needs more oxygen than breathing can provide. Thie gap between the demand for oxygen in the muscles, and the actual amount of oxygen delivered, is called oxygen debt.

HIIT is considered anaerobic (“without oxygen”) exercise because your body uses more oxygen than it can be supplied. This is why with HIIT, you’ll run out of breath more quickly than traditional steady state cardio exercise. Your muscles will utilize more oxygen (caused by the buildup of lactic acid in the muscles). The rest periods in HIIT are important because it allows your body to clear the lactic acid and restore oxygen levels.

Advantages of HIIT

Here are a few advantages of high intensity interval training that may help you decide if HIIT is right for you.

Shorter Sessions

If you are deciding between HIIT or other long, slow duration cardio, the time factor may be a big key to consider. HIIT sessions are much shorter and more time efficient than typical cardio sessions. This is because the intensity levels are higher so you will become fatigued more quickly.

Excess Post-Exercise Oxygen Consumption (EPOC)

Unlike with steady state cardio, HIIT workouts help keep your body burning calories long after your session is done because of EPOC. EPOC, or Excess Post-Exercise Oxygen Consumption, refers to the amount of oxygen required to return the body to its normal metabolic level (called homeostasis). The higher the intensity level, the longer the EPOC will be.

The body has to work hard to restore the oxygen levels up that it lost during the session, which is why you continue to burn calories (and fat) post-workout, even for up to 24 + hours, according to research.

Better for Long-term Fat Loss

While people see great results with steady state aerobic exercise at the start, HIIT has been shown to be better for long-term fat loss results.

Helps with Muscle Retention

One reason why hard core gym goers tend to avoid cardio is that they do not want to lose muscle. HIIT helps retain muscle because it can include movements that activate the muscles the same way that strength training does.

Disadvantages

More Demanding on the Body

Due to the high intensity nature of HIIT, you do place a lot more stress on the body. This also means that there is an increased risk of injury.

Longer Recovery Time

It does take longer to recover from a HIIT workout so due to the physical demands, it can be challenging to complete a HIIT workout every single day so you will have to find alternate workout options in between to give your body a break.

Can be Intimidating for Beginners

It can be intimidating for new gym goers to give it a go at first. It does look intense because it is intense but also very rewarding!

So Should I Choose HIIT?

The final answer does depend on your preference and lifestyle. If you find yourself skipping workouts because you’re dreading the hour-long jog, then try giving HIIT a go. If you hate the intensity of HIIT, then turn to steady state cardio. A good idea, however, would be to do both on alternate days and rotate between the two so that you can reap the benefits of each.

Use the Award-Winning Jefit App for All Your Training Needs

Jefit is a gym workout app that helps all gym goers and athletes keep on track with their fitness goals. Not only does it you the ability to update and share your workout log with the supportive community, it has the largest exercise library that covers both weight training and cardio.

blank

Try One of These 8 Exercise Programs on Jefit App

blank

The award-winning Jefit app currently offers more than three thousand different exercise programs. You name it, and Jefit offers it on their app. From basic strength programs, to muscle endurance, 5 x 5 training programs, bodyweight circuits and even Tabata and HIIT workouts. Individuals who use our app can try one of the exercise programs mentioned, or of course, design their own workout.

Below are eight exercise programs that we wanted to mention. Each one is currently featured on the Jefit app, if you want to check one of them out. Let us know if you end up downloading any of the programs. Also, we’re interested in hearing your thoughts on what you consider the best strength programs that you have tried on the Jefit app?

Jefit Exercise Programs to Try (“Click” a Workout Title to See the Actual Program)

*****

High-Intensity Interval v.1

As with any HIIT session, the idea is to train using a high intensity, which at times can be easier said than done! You should be breathing heavy (“winded”) by the end of each set. Perform as many repetitions as possible (“AMRAP”) based on the interval time that is prescribed. This is one way to make sure that you get the most out of each workout.

The program includes 3-days, intermediate-level, full body, HIIT sessions. Each session in the program starts off with a brief 3 bodyweight movement prep to get the body ready for a high-intensity session. Following this, you’ll dive into a full body, interval-based, circuit using supersets. The main portion of the workout consists of 5 pair of supersets. Each subsequent workout session is a little more challenging as a result of an increase in the volume of work (sets x repetitions).

Equipment needed: kettlebells and plyo box (or a small step or bench).

Six Week Six-Pack Abs

For those looking to build a defined their six pack the old fashioned way, use this routine, for six weeks, to get you the sculpted and defined abs that you have been looking for. Each exercise will help target a different area of the abdominal muscles from the obliques to the lower abs to the whole core.

Weeks 1 – 3

For the first three weeks when you do your workouts in this exercise program, you will do ab exercises with more repetitions and less sets. When working with more repetitions, you have the potential to burn more calories and fat surrounding the abdominal muscles that you are targeting and working hard to develop. A big component here is what you end up doing away from the gym. Such as, getting enough sleep, expending additional calories if needed, and focusing on a healthy diet.

You will perform this set of exercises three days each week as you focus on technique, intensity, and the amount of repetitions performed.

Exercises

  • Weighted Crunches
  • Ab Rollout on Knees
  • Hanging Leg Raise
  • Decline Crunch
  • Kneeling Cable Pulldown

*** (Notes : With the first 3 weeks of the routine, you will be performing the same exercises with the same movements, volume and resistance).

Weeks 4 – 6

For weeks four through six in this exercise program, you will be asked to increase the volume and the resistance of each exercise that you do in the routine. Increasing the resistance and volume will require your abdominal muscles to strengthen thus building more defined and fuller abs.

This set of exercises are also performed for three days each week, with the focus on the volume and resistance during the workout.

Exercises

  • Dumbbell Side Bend
  • Cable Side Bends
  • Weighted Hanging Knee Raise
  • Weighted Decline Crunch
  • Cable Crunch

*** (Notes : During the final 3 weeks of the routine, there is more focus on performing each repetition to its fullest with added weight to each exercise to build size and strength. You want to keep a controlled pace at all times and focus on the contraction on the muscles during each repetition).

FitBody Plan

This intermediate session offers two training sessions that can be done 1-2x/week. Meaning, two sessions or if you like, repeat for 4 sessions/week taking a rest day between workouts. The goal of this plan is to build a base-level of general strength across all major muscle groups.

Program Routine

Day 1 – Legs, Back, Core, Chest

Day 2 – Shoulder, Core, Arms

Nutrition Tips

Really pay attention to your diet while following this exercise program. Eat whole foods while consuming plenty of healthy carbs, fat, fiber and at least 1 gram of protein/kilogram of body weight. Supplement meals and all workouts with a whey protein drink if needed. Make sure it contains the amino acid leucine though. Use 25-35 grams/protein in any protein drink or meal. Drink plenty of H2O and get 7-8 hours of sleep. Eat well and stay strong!

blank
Bodyweight Forward Lunge
blank
Bodyweight Squat

Dumbbell Only

This workout routine is for anyone who can’t get to a gym or is looking for a full body routine using dumbbells only.

For individuals who put their gym membership on “hold” or aren’t able to get to a gym; this routine will provide a sufficient full-body, 3-day split routine. An individual can target all their main body parts and either gain/maintain muscle mass until life gets back to normal.

The plan focuses on heavy lifts using 3 to 4 sets with 10 repetitions per set to increase muscle mass and overall size over the course of the program.

Notes

If you would like to perform more cardio, you can substitute rest days for cardio days.

Warm Up

Especially for compound lifts we recommend warming up with lighter weights before your working sets. A common warmup scheme is 10-15 sets with a very light weight, followed by intermediate sets until you do 1 repetition of your working weight

Reps, Sets and Rest

There are many different rep schemes that’ll help you reach your goals. We’ve set 3 sets of 8 repetitions by default, but feel free to change it to your own liking.

Bigger, Leaner, Stronger – Barbell & Dumbbell

This is a 5-day full body, strength training program. Check out this full body exercise program that will leave you pumped after each strength training workout.

20-Minute HIIT Circuit

In this program you’ll be doing 4 rounds of twenty exercises in quick succession.

The key to any circuit training routine is to make sure that you do not rest in between sets or in between exercises until you complete all of the exercises in the circuit. This will keep your metabolic rate up ensuring that you burn as many calories as possible without sacrificing strength.

Take full use of your rests after each round! It will prepare you for the later rounds.

Warming Up

Make sure you have a light sweat before you start your workout. Especially for compound lifts we recommend warming up with lighter weights before your working sets. A typical warm-up might include a few sets with a very light weight, followed by intermediate sets until you do 1 repetition of your working weight.

Reps, Sets and Rest

There are many different rep schemes that’ll help you reach your goals. We’ve set 3 sets of 8 reps by default, but feel free to change it to your own liking.

3-Day Split

This 3-day routine is a favorite in the Jefit community due to the fact that it has been downloaded almost 1800 times.

A split workout is designed to train different muscle groups on different days before giving them time to recover before they’re trained again.

The 3-day split is a great balance for those that want results, but don’t have the time to spend more sessions in the gym. This plan focuses on the exercises that maximize work on the targeted muscles.

Warming Up

Especially for compound lifts we recommend warming up with lighter weights before your working sets. A common warmup scheme is a few sets with a very light weight, followed by a few intermediate sets, until you do 1 repetition of your working weight.

Reps, Sets and Rest

There are many different repetition schemes that’ll help you reach your goals. We’ve set 3 sets of 8 repetitions by default, but feel free to change it to your own liking.

Power and Strength Routine

This is another very popular strength training program on Jefit with about 2200 downloads to date. This is a power and strength routine that is focused on gaining strength within the muscles.

You will be performing major muscle and power building multi-joint exercises. These exercise focus at time, on the use of all the little muscles to do each exercise, thus creating optimal growth and strength gaining.

Since you are performing major muscle building exercises, there is no need to perform sets to failure, drop sets or decreasing the amount of repetitions. To build the power and strength in your muscles you want to perform the amount of sets and repetitions to the number that is being presented. This prevents from bulking up in muscle mass without gaining any strength and power or cutting and losing strength.

In this routine you will be alternating the different weeks performed for up to 6 – 8 weeks; this is for optimal muscle growth and strength.

Use Jefit App to Plan & Track Workouts

The award-winning Jefit app, was named best app for 2021 by PC Magazine and Men’s Health. The app comes equipped with a customizable workout planner, training log, the ability to track data and share workouts with friends. Take advantage of Jefit’s huge exercise database for your strength workouts. Visit our members-only Facebook group. Connect with like-minded people, share tips, and advice to help get closer to reaching your fitness goals. Try one of the new interval-based workouts and add it to your weekly training schedule. Stay strong with Jefit.

blank

HIIT Burns More Calories In Half The Time

blank

“High-intensity interval training (HIIT) describes physical exercise that is characterized by brief, intermittent bursts of vigorous activity, interspersed by periods of rest or low-intensity exercise.”

Martin Gibala, PhD

High-intensity interval training, or HIIT burns more calories than other types traditional cardio exercise. For those who can’t even think about doing cardio, remember, high intensity interval training has many benefits. The big one being HIIT burns more calories in half the amount of time as traditional steady state exercise.

I’m sure you have your strength training routine down, especially if you’re using the Jefit workout app. The award-winning app has helped literally millions of members get stronger and in turn transform lives. The question, though, is what are you doing on the cardiovascular side of things? Staying strong is a must but so is maintaining aerobic fitness especially as you age. As this happens, you typically build work capacity, and subsequently can handle a higher volume in future strength workouts.

There are probably more research studies currently in progress, involving various forms of HIIT, than any other exercise-related research being conducted. A great deal of the HIIT research that has been published over the past decade by researchers like Martin Gibala, PhD, from McMaster University in Ontario, Canada, continue to show amazing results when compared to traditional cardio exercise. Gibala and colleagues offer their definition of HIIT above.

HIIT RESEARCH

In a study by Matsuo and colleagues (2014), a group of sedentary men performed 13-minutes of high intensity interval training five times a week for 8-weeks. The  (HIIT) group burned more calories per minutes on average than men who performed 40-minutes of traditional steady state cardio. During the study the HIIT group saw a 12.5 percent gain in maximal oxygen consumption (VO2 max) using 27 less minutes of exercise. Tomoaki Matsuo, Ph.D, co-author of the study published in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, suggest doing three-minute HIIT stages with two-minute active recovery stages repeated for three rounds.

A study published in the Journal of Applied Physiology (1990) by Makrides et al., showed that 12-weeks of high-intensity training produced greater increases in total work accomplished in 30-seconds in old (60-70 year old, 12.5 percent) than young (20-30 year old, 8 percent) test subjects.

One study in the journal Metabolism compared 20-weeks of aerobic training with only 15-weeks of high intensity interval training (HIIT) in which participants did 15 sprints for 30-seconds and lost nine times more body fat than the aerobic and control groups. They also lost 12 percent more visceral belly fat than the aerobic group.

ADDITIONAL BENEFITS OF HIIT

A study in the International Journal of Obesity compared the effect of 15-weeks of HIIT with aerobic exercise. The HIIT group resulted in significant decreases in overall fat mass (3.3 pounds) while the aerobic exercise group had a fat gain of 1 pound on average. The HIIT group also had a significant 9.5 percent decrease in belly fat, while the aerobic group increased their belly fat by 10.5 percent by the end of the study. A 2012 study at Colorado State University found that test subjects who worked out on a stationary bike for less than 25-minutes, with just a few sprints mixed in, expended an additional 200 calories a day, due to excess-post oxygen consumption (EPOC) or commonly known as the after-burn effect.

A 2015 study published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research by Falcone and colleagues, compared the energy expenditure of single exercise sessions using resistance, aerobic, and combined exercise involving the same duration. The test subjects were young, active men. All sessions were 30-minutes. The resistance training session used 75 percent of their 1-RM, the aerobic session, on a treadmill, used 70 percent maximum heart rate while a high-intensity interval session (HIIT) session was done on a hydraulic resistance system (HRS). The HRS workout used intervals of 20-seconds of maximum effort followed by 40-seconds of rest. The HIIT session using the HRS had the highest caloric expenditure of the three workouts. The data suggest that individuals can burn more calories performing HIIT with HRS than spending the same amount of time performing steady-state exercise.

MORE RESEARCH

A 2007 study published in the Journal of Applied Physiology looked at moderately active women who in their early twenties. The subjects were tested for power output on a stationary bike to determine what their VO2max was and then made to ride for 60-minutes at 60 percent of VO2max intensity. These tests were then repeated again at the end of the study to gauge the effectiveness of HIIT for this particular subject group. This particular training protocol showed some of the following results: a lower heart rate in the last 30-minutes of the 60-minute session, whole body fat oxidation increased significantly by 36 percent in only two-weeks using just 7 workout sessions.

A final study, published in the journal Cell Metabolism (2012), observed healthy but inactive people who exercised intensely. The research concluded even if the exercise is brief, it can produce an immediate change in DNA. “While the underlying genetic code in the muscle remains unchanged, exercise causes important structural and chemical changes to the DNA molecules within the muscles.”

HIIT EXAMPLE

There are many different HIIT formats available that an individual can choose from. A few examples of HIIT include, Tabata protocol, 30-20-10 protocol, 1 x 4 or the Go-To Workout. This last one is a favorite of many, including Martin Gibala, PhD, himself. It is performed often because it develops strength and cardiovascular fitness. The workout duration is only 10-minutes. Following a brief warm-up, alternate a bodyweight exercise, one for the upper and lower body, with some type of cardio exercise, like jumping rope. Each interval is 30-seconds long. Each set of exercise should be difficult to finish. You can decrease the intensity when it comes to the bouts of cardio. Repeat this sequence for 10-minutes. Here is an example of the Go-To Workout.

Warm-up for 3-5 minutes

  • Split Jumps (30-seconds)
  • Push-ups (30-seconds)
  • Jump Rope (30-seconds)
  • Step-ups
  • Inverted Row
  • Stationary bike
  • Jump Squats
  • Bicycle Abs
  • Jog

Repeat x 2 rounds for 10-minutes. Instead of using 30-second intervals you could also use a specific number of repetitions for each set. Still not sure? HIIT burns more calories than traditional steady state cardio exercise.

As the HIIT research continues to prove, it is advantageous to supplement your current exercise routine with at least one HIIT session each week to maximize your training results. HIIT continues to show significant results when looking at total caloric expenditure, gains in VO2max, and elevated post oxygen consumption (EPOC). All this gained for just a few minutes of intense exercise!

USE THE JEFIT APP

Millions of members have had great success transforming their bodies using the Jefit app. The app is a customizable workout planner, training log, can track data and share workouts with friends. Take advantage of Jefit’s huge exercise database for your strength workouts. Visit our members-only Facebook group. Connect with like-minded people, share tips, and advice to help get closer to reaching your fitness goals. Stay strong with Jefit.

REFERENCES

Matsuo T, Saotome K, Seino S, Shimojo N, Matsushita A, Iemitsu M, Ohshima H, Tanaka K, Mukai C. (2014). Effects of a low-volume aerobic-type interval exercise on VO2max and cardiac mass. Sports Exerc. 46(1):42-50. doi:10.1249/MSS.0b013e3182a38da8

Falcone PH, Tai CY, Carson LR, Joy JM, Mosman MM, McCann TR, Crona KP, Kim MP, Moon JR (2015). Caloric expenditure of aerobic, resistance, or combined high-intensity interval training using a hydraulic resistance system in healthy men. Strength Cond Res. 29(3):779-85. doi: 10.1519/JSC.000000000000066

Makrides L. Heigenhauser GJ. Jones NL (1990). High-intensity endurance training in 20- to 30- and 60- to 70-yr-old healthy men. Journal of Applied Physiology. 69(5):1792-8.

Gibala, M., The One-Minute Workout. Avery: New York, 2017.

blank

Here Are The Highest Calorie Burning Exercises to Choose

blank

The following article takes a look at the best movements to choose when you want to use the highest calorie burning exercises. There are many exercises that are available to you when working out from home or the gym. But what are the best options from a high caloric expenditure stand point? We have looked through the research and various articles to bring you that list.

These types of exercises are great individually or when mixed into a circuit or high-intensity training session. Obviously, the heavier the person, the higher the caloric expenditure per minute of exercise. Just a reminder when you look over this and other types of data like this.

Various Factors Affecting Calorie Burn

There are many factors that go into determining how many calories someone expends during exercise. Here is a great article on that topic by Robert Robergs, PhD and Len Kravitz, PhD. Here are eight factors, many of which you can manipulate, that will influence your calorie burn.

*Bodyweight

Basically, the more you weigh, the greater amount of calories you expend during exercise. Pretty simple.

*Type of Exercise

Cardio-based workouts typically involve higher calorie burning exercises. They usually burn more calories than other types of workouts like strength training or doing yoga. The key word here is intensity. Finally, there can be a different outcome with a well-designed exercise program. See the study, found below, by Falcone and colleagues reporting a HIIT session out performing a cardio workout involving men as test subjects.

*Exercise Intensity

The higher the intensity, the more calories you end up burning per minute. If I can get all exercise physiology on you for a moment…for every liter of oxygen you consume during exercise you expend about 5 calories. Keep in mind, the harder you breathe during activity, the greater the oxygen intake resulting in a higher caloric expenditure. Not to mention an elevated EPOC hours after your exercise is done.

*EPOC

Stands for excess post oxygen consumption. The higher the exercise intensity, the higher the “after burn.” Meaning, your body continues to expend calories long after the workout is finished. For this to happen, though, it has to be a very heavy lifting day or a HIT type workout. The intensity needs to be very high during the workout. As in, you couldn’t carry on a conversation because you’re breathing so hard.

*Compound Movements

When you perform a total body movement like a deadlift or push press exercise, you’ll burn more calories than say a concentrated biceps curl.

*Men Typically Burn More Calories than Women

This is simply a result of most men having a higher percentage of muscle mass than most women. This is not always the case however. Over the years I have run stadium stairs with female Olympic and college athletes. I can attest, some female athletes can out do any guy… it can be a truly humbling experience!

*Current Fitness Level

There are many benefits to living a healthy lifestyle. Staying in great shape allows an individual to work harder in their workouts and in turn, elicit a greater calorie burn during exercise.

*Your Age

The older the person, the less calories they burn in a given period of time. This is due to muscle mass. As we age we lose muscle and this affects metabolic rate and calorie burn.

Highest Calorie Burning Exercises for Short Duration

A Men’s Journal article compared four different activities, using a 5-minute testing period, to rank the highest caloric expenditure.  The four different exercises included: body-weight exercises, jogging, swinging a kettlebell, and jumping rope.  All are great forms of exercises and you need minimal equipment to perform each exercise. They determined jumping rope was number one, when it came to a 5-minute workout, burning 79 calories while the body weight exercises, consisting of push-ups and pull-ups, came in fifth using 51 total calories.

Jumping rope is a great training tool and should be used more prior to a workout. To continue on the topic of jumping rope, it has been reported that 10-minutes of jumping rope is equivalent to jogging for 30-minutes. Interesting numbers, though, especially the kettlebell swings being higher than pushing and pulling your body weight for 5-minutes. This was probably due to the subject getting more total swings with a kettlebell during the 5-minute period.

1st – Jumping Rope (79 calories/5-minutes)

2nd – Swinging a Kettlebell (63 calories/5-minutes)

3rd – Jogging (53 calories/5-minutes)

4th – Push-Up & Pull-Up combo (51 calories/5-minutes)

Men’s Journal

Here are a few great activities that the next study can hopefully look at. Compare the effects of 5-minutes of cross-country skiing or snow-shoeing, jogging up hill, HIIT using a bike or rower, an Assault bike (Schwinn Air-Dyne), Concept 2 Cross-Country Ski, CLMBR, and stadium stair running.

Some of the Highest Calorie Burning Exercises for Longer Duration

There was another report that I came across, with somewhat different results, that looked at calories burn for 10 to 30-minutes of activity. The group used an energy calculator from the American Council on Exercise (ACE). The study did acknowledge that every body is different and while one routine may work well for one person it might not be as efficient for another. Here are the results from that particular study. Keep in mind these numbers were based individuals who weighed only 130-pounds.

1st – Running/Jogging – 206 calories per 30-minutes

2nd – Hiking – 176 calories per 30-minutes.

3rd – Biking/Cycling – 5.5 mph – 117 calories per 30-minutes

4th – Jumping Rope – (fast pace) – 115 calories per 10-minutes*

5th – Walking (moderate pace) – 97 calories per 30-minutes

6th – Weightlifting – 88 calories per 30-minutes

CNET

Obviously, if you are are 200-pound male, these numbers would be significantly higher. Again, the different calorie outputs for jumping rope (for 5 and 10 minutes) most likely, had do to bodyweight and speed of jumping (i.e., pace or rpm or # of toe taps).

In one last article, Harvard Medical School reported calorie burn for over 100 different activities. The group looked at the difference in calorie burn for 30-minutes of activity for 125, 155 and 185-pound individuals. They also did not report if they were men or women, or how much lean muscle they had, so keep that in mind. They just looked at overall bodyweight.

What The Exercise Research Says

A 2015 study published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research by Falcone and colleagues, compared the energy expenditure of single exercise sessions using resistance, aerobic, and combined exercise involving the same duration. The test subjects were young, active men. All sessions were 30-minutes. The resistance training session used 75 percent of their 1-RM, the aerobic session, on a treadmill, used 70 percent maximum heart rate. The high-intensity interval session (HIIT) session was done on a hydraulic resistance system (HRS). The HRS workout used intervals of 20-seconds of maximum effort followed by 40-seconds of rest. The HIIT session using the HRS had the highest caloric expenditure of the three workouts. The data suggest that individuals can burn more calories performing HIIT with HRS than spending the same amount of time performing steady-state exercise.

A 2012 study at Colorado State University found that test subjects who worked out on a stationary bike for less than 25 minutes, with just a few sprints mixed in, expended an additional 200 calories a day, due to excess-post oxygen consumption (EPOC) or commonly known as the after-burn effect.

The Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise reviewed interval training. Subjects exercised using high-intensity intervals. The total amount of calories expended one-hour post workout was 107 percent more than low-intensity, short duration exercise. And 143 percent more than with low intensity, long duration exercise! That’s because interval exercise peaking at levels above a 70 percent maximum-intensity effort, speeds up metabolism for up to three hours after exercise – a benefit not found with low-intensity exercise.

Hopefully this article sheds more light on this topic regarding the best exercises to choose when the main interest is high calorie burn.

Stay Strong With Jefit

Join the millions of members who have had great success using the Jefit app. The award-winning app comes equipped with a customizable workout planner, training log, the ability to track data and share workouts with friends. Take advantage of Jefit’s huge exercise database for your strength workouts. Visit our members-only Facebook group. Connect with like-minded people, share tips, and advice to help get closer to reaching your fitness goals. Stay strong with Jefit.

blank

HIIT or LISS: Which One Will Get Me Better Results?

HIIT or LISS

While we all know that getting in daily exercise is important to everyone, there is much debate about what kind of exercise is best for us, especially with cardio training. There are two popular forms of cardio HIIT (High Intensity Interval Training) and LISS (Low Intensity Steady State Cardio). Each has their own pros and cons, so if you are wondering whether to do HIIT or LISS, here is what you should know.

Is HIIT or LISS Better For Me?

LISS – Low Intensity Steady State Cardio

LISS or Low Intensity Steady State Cardio, is a form of aerobic (“with oxygen”) exercise. This means that improves your oxygen intake. LISS is typically performed for 30-60 minutes at a steady pace with limited changes in speed or intensity. It is referred to as low intensity as you usually only hit 45-65% of your estimated maximum heart rate.

Advantages

If you are comparing HIIT or LISS, LISS is advantageous in a number of areas.

Less demanding on the body

Because it is low intensity, it is less demanding on the body. It is also easier on the joints, tendons and ligaments.

Less injury risk

It also means that the risk of injury is also much lower than other alternative forms. You are moving at a steadier pace so you are not pushing yourself too hard, with can be hard on the body.

Better at initial fat burn

One of the best benefits of LISS is that it is better at fat burning than HIIT, initially. You use the fat stored in your body as the primary source of energy as opposed to glycogen. This is why when people start doing LISS, they see great results.

Disadvantages

However, there are some downfalls that might mean turning to other forms of cardio for the results that you want.

Longer sessions

While the sessions themselves are not as taxing as HIIT, this means that your workouts will be much longer; you are not using as much energy as fast. If you are busy or don’t have much time, LISS may not be the best option for you.

Less motivated to workout

Following on from that, because the sessions are longer, you may be less motivated to actually get started in the first place.

Only burns calories during the workout

Another downfall of LISS is that you only burn calories while you are doing the workout. Unfortunately, once your session is done, you will not continue to burn calories afterwards.

The body adapts quickly to LISS

While I mentioned that LISS is great for fat burning initially, the keyword here was initially. This is because your body will quickly adapt to your LISS workouts, meaning that the once-great results you may have seen at the start will not last long.

HIIT – High Intensity Interval Training

On the other hand of the spectrum is HIIT aka High Intensity Interval Training. HIIT has become a buzzword in the fitness industry, gaining momentum in popularity.

HIIT consists of shorter more intense sessions of 10-60 seconds of work. This is alternated with rest or light activity time (this is where the interval part of the name comes in). HIIT brings your heart rate up to 70-90% of your maximum heart rate.

Unlike LISS, HIIT is anaerobic (“without oxygen”) exercise because your body uses more oxygen than it can be supplied. This why with HIIT, you will run out of breath more quickly and your muscles will burn (caused by the buildup of lactic acid in the muscles). The rest periods in HIIT are important because it allows your body to clear the lactic acid and rebuild oxygen levels.

Advantages

Here are some advantages of high intensity interval training that may help you decide between HIIT or LISS.

Shorter sessions

If you are deciding between HIIT or LISS, the time factor may be a big key to consider. HIIT sessions are much shorter and more time efficient than LISS sessions. This is because the intensity levels are higher so you will become fatigued quite quickly.

Excess Post-Exercise Oxygen Consumption (EPOC)

Unlike with LISS, HIIT workouts help keep your body burning calories long after your session is done because of EPOC. EPOC, or Excess Post-Exercise Oxygen Consumption, refers to the amount of oxygen required to return the body to its normal metabolic level (called homeostasis).

The body has to work hard to rebuild the oxygen levels up that it lost during the session, which is why you continue to burn calories and fat post-workout, even for up to 24 hours.

Better for long-term fat loss

While people see great results with LISS at the start, HIIT is better for long-term fat loss results.

Helps with muscle retention

One reason why people tend to avoid cardio is that they do not want to lose muscle. HIIT helps with retaining muscle because it includes weight training and movements that activate the muscles the same way that strength training does.

Disadvantages

More demanding on the body

Due to the high intensity nature of HIIT, you do place a lot more stress on the body. This also means that there is an increased risk of injury.

Longer recovery time

It does take longer to recover from a HIIT workout so due to the physical demands, it can be challenging to complete HIIT workout every single day so you will have to find alternate workouts in between to give your body a break.

Can be intimidating for beginners

It can be intimidating for new people to give it a go at first. It does look intense because it is intense but also very rewarding!

So Should I Choose HIIT or LISS?

The final answer does depend on your preference and lifestyle. If you find yourself skipping workouts because you’re dreading the hour-long jog, then try giving HIIT a go. If you hate the intensity of HIIT, then turn to LISS. A good idea, however, would be to do both on alternate days and rotate between the two so that you can reap the benefits of each.

Jefit is a gym workout app that helps all gym goers and athletes keep on track with their fitness goals. Not only does it you the ability to update and share your workout log with the supportive community, it has the largest exercise library that covers both weight training and cardio.

HIIT or LISS