A Few Things to Look For to Avoid Metabolic Syndrome?

According to the American Heart Association, 34 million American have metabolic syndrome. That is about one out of every six adults or 47 million people. It is not some type of disease but rather a “cluster of conditions” that are associated with your metabolism. Metabolic syndrome is also known as syndrome X or insulin resistance syndrome. The conditions that you may want to be aware of are the following.

Keep an Eye on These Six Metrics

1. Extra fat covering your abdominal area.

2. Low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL).

3. Higher than normal blood pressure.

4. Blood that clots too easily.

5. Problems with the way your body processes insulin.

6. High levels of fats in your blood.

If you have three or more of the conditions listed above, your physician will let you know, and it’s important that you exercise regularly and work on keeping your bodyweight down via exercise and a healthy diet. Speaking of healthy, sustainable diets, there is a great deal of research showing the benefits of eating a mediterranean diet and the positive impact it has on this syndrome.

Preventing Metabolic Sundrome

Here are a few items you need to focus on if you have metabolic syndrome, and if you don’t, you should still be working on keeping these in line because “the best medicine is prevention”:

  • Maintain a waist circumference <40 inches for males and <35 for females.
  • Keep your blood triglycerides <150 mg/dl
  • Keep your blood pressure <130/85
  • Your blood glucose levels should be <100 mg/dl

We previously mentioned that more than 34 percent of Americans currently have metabolic syndrome. A recent study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology found the prevalence and trends of metabolic syndrome among Americans are on the rise.

References

Ford, ES et al. (2002). Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among U.S. adults: findings from the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Journal American Medical Association, 287: 356-359

Cornier, Marc-Andre et al. (2008). The Metabolic Syndrome. Endocrine Reviews, 29(7): 777– 822.

Stay Stronger Together with Jefit App

Jefit, was named best strength training app for 2022 by MUOBYRDIE, ORIGYM and many others. It has a community that’s responsible for 92,000,000 workouts to date! The app, which recently passed 10 million downloads, comes equipped with a customizable workout planner and training log. The app has ability to track data, offer audio coaching cues, and can share workouts with friends. Take advantage of Jefit’s exercise database for your strength workouts. Visit our members-only Facebook group. Connect with like-minded people, share tips, and advice to help get closer to reaching your fitness goals. #staystrongtogether

Healthy Lifestyle Makes a Positive Impact on Metabolic Health

The majority of Americans were classified as unhealthy prior to the pandemic hitting. With many of us self quarantining at home since then, that number, sadly, has probably only increased.

Many people actually think “healthy” refers to how much they weigh or what someones outward appearance looks like. Good overall health, however, starts internally. This is where the term metabolic health comes in. Some also refer to this as metabolic fitness. In any event, metabolic health is the absence of metabolic disease. The numbers in this country are not good. About 88 percent of Americans are considered to have metabolic disease. The good news, though, metabolic health can improve through healthy eating and regular exercise, especially a short walk after meals.

“Flying blind, 45 million Americans go on a diet each year. Using their best judgment, 59% of people say conflicting nutrition information makes them question their choices. Worse, only 12% of all Americans are actually metabolically healthy.”

Anthony Vennare – Co-Founder, Fitt Insider

Research on Metabolic Health

In a 2019 study published in the journal Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders, a group of researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill reviewed data from 8,721 adults as reported in the 2009 to 2016 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). They found that just 1 in 8 adults living in United States had optimal metabolic health.

A second study published in 2016 in the journal Circulation, applied seven lifestyle and risk factors criteria from the American Heart Association to national data published between 2011 to 2012. The results found virtually 0% of U.S. adults met all the ideal levels. These levels included: not smoking, having a healthy diet, physical activity, normal weight and total cholesterol, blood pressure, and glucose level.

Finally, it has been determined through research that 23 percent of adults have metabolic syndrome. This condition occurs when a person fails to meet at least three of the ideal measurements with things like blood pressure and glucose levels (seen below).

What Constitutes Metabolic Health?

Using most recent guidelines, metabolic health was defined as having optimal levels of the following six criteria.

  • Waist Circumference (WC <40/34 inches for men/women respectively).
  • Glucose (fasting glucose <100 mg/dl).
  • Hemoglobin (A1c <5.7%).
  • Blood Pressure (systolic <120 and diastolic <80 mmHg).
  • Triglycerides (<150 mg/dl).
  • High Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol (≥40/50 mg/dl for men/women), and not taking any related medication.

Likewise, the International Diabetes Federation, states metabolic unhealthy individuals were defined as those who presented at least one of the following criteria:

  • Systolic/Diastolic Blood Pressure ≥130/85 mm Hg or use of antihypertensive drug.
  • Triglycerides level ≥150 mg/dl.
  • HDL-Cholesterol Level < 40 mg/dl in men or < 50 mg/dl in women or use of lipid-lowering drugs.
  • Glucose level ≥100 mg/dl or use of antidiabetic drug.

Intermittent Fasting and Metabolic Health

A possible tool to help improve metabolic health is intermittent fasting (IF). There has been a great deal of research over the years on the effects of IF on the body, including metabolic health. A review published in the revered New Journal of Medicine by Rafael de Cabo, Ph.D., and Mark P. Mattson, Ph.D., looked at the powerful effects of IF including glucose regulation that could help your metabolic health cause.

Intermittent fasting elicits evolutionarily conserved, adaptive cellular responses that are integrated between and within organs in a manner that improves glucose regulation, increases stress resistance, and suppresses inflammation. During fasting, cells activate pathways that enhance intrinsic defenses against oxidative and metabolic stress and those that remove or repair damaged molecules.”

Rafael de Cabo, Ph.D., and Mark P. Mattson, Ph.D

Therefore, continue to focus on regular exercise each week. Specifically, strength training and various forms of high intensity interval exercise. Mix this into your cardio at least 1-2 times a week. In addition, have your blood profile checked yearly or better yet, every six months to keep a handle on your metabolic health.

Get Strong and Stay Strong with Jefit

Millions of members have had great success using the Jefit app, equipped with a customizable workout planner, training log, the ability to track data and share workouts with friends. Take advantage of Jefit’s huge exercise database for your strength workouts. Visit our members-only Facebook group. Connect with like-minded people, share tips, and advice to help get closer to reaching your fitness goals. Stay strong with Jefit.